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Tema: History of the Andalusian Horse

  1. #1
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    History of the Andalusian Horse


    Andalucia has a rich equestrian history.


    By Sue Wolk

    The world's most aristocratic equine population owes its fame to the Andalusian horse, along with the Arab and, much later, the Thoroughbred.

    Its history goes back long before the birth of Christ - to 200 BC, at the time of the Roman Conquests in and around Spain. Roman writers praised the native Spanish horses' qualities, which were recognised by Spain's Moorish conquerors, who naturally cross-bred them with their own Arab and Berber breeds.

    After the Moors were driven from Spain in the 15th Century, these noble Spanish creatures enjoyed a period of great popularity, influencing almost all other American and European horse breeds.

    Not only were they taken by the Spanish conquistadors to the New World in the Americas, but they laid the foundation of the Frederiksborg, the royal horse of Denmark; the Neapolitan horse, when Naples was under Spanish rule from 1504 to 1713; the Austrian Kladruber, and some of the British breeds, notably the Cleveland Bay, the Hackney, the Connemara pony of Ireland and possibly the Welsh Cob.

    Direct descendants of the Andalusian horse are the Lippizaners of the Spanish Riding School in Vienna, established in 1572 as an adjunct to the Court in order to educate their nobility in the equitational arts. It was called the Spanish Riding School because right from its formation only Spanish stallions were used there.

    The Lippizaners take their name from the stud at Lippiza, near Trieste, then part of the Austrian empire. It was founded by Archduke Charles 11, in 1580, who had 9 stallions and 24 mares brought there from Spain.

    This is the horse that became "The very cornerstone of classical riding." The features that made this caballo de pura raza española - horse of pure Spanish breed - so highly sought after, are its balletic elegance, high head carriage, short arched neck, silky flowing mane, compact body and wonderful proportions.

    The manes of mares are usually clipped in Spain; only the stallions are allowed to display the full splendour of theirs. About 50 per cent of Andalusians are usually grey or white, the rest being bay or black. Chestnuts or piebalds are excluded from the stud book.

    These attributes are combined with a fiery intelligence, strangely at odds with it's affectionate and docile temperament. It is considered to be the ideal haute école parade and carriage horse. It is perhaps somewhat surprising, therefore, that its presence outside Spain is not more widespread today.

    "It can only be the whims of changing fashion that, for the moment, deny him his place in competitive dressage - that and perhaps the extraordinarily extravagant and high action of his forelegs" suggests Elwyn Hartley Edwards in his engaging book, "Horses, their Role in the History of Man". The Andalusian does, in fact, "dish" - throw his forelegs in an outward arc before putting his feet to the ground. In Spain, the action is highly esteemed but in countries like England, it is not appreciated at all.



    Source: Andalucian Horses, Rural Tourism in Andalucía, Southern Spain
    Última edición por Lo ferrer; 25/07/2009 a las 22:39
    "Donau abric a Espanya, la malmenada Espanya
    que ahir abrigava el món,
    i avui és com lo cedre que veu en la muntanya
    descoronar son front"

    A la Reina de Catalunya

  2. #2
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    Respuesta: History of the Andalusian Horse

    After almost eight centuries of domination by the Arabs the legacy they left Spain consists not only of some beautiful words such as algibes, almenas, alcazares that flow from the mouth like water emanating from the fountains in Arabic houses and palaces, they also left one of the most precious treasures of all, the Andalusian (or Spanish) horse, a strong tempered, yet sensitive, obedient and very beautiful animal.

    The origins of the Andalusian haven't been accurately determined.

    However, we have enough evidence to trace the origin of the Carthusian thoroughbred Spanish horses which are unique in the world. In the 15th century a Carthusian Monastery was founded 5 km from Jerez, Andalusia. The monks started to breed horses with splendid studs, achieving ideal crossings and treating the horses with utmost care. The result was the world famous Carthusian, the essence of today's Andalusian horse.

    Without their consent, these brave horses always involved in the wars of the turbulent Spanish history. They were first involved in the reconquest of Spain's Arabs territories and in the Conquest of America; then they fought in the European wars, which gained them renown throughout the continent. La Guerniere, the horseman in France, used to say the Spanish horses are the best for riding, taming and training and the most appropriate to be ridden by a King on a victorious day.

    The Andalusian horse, which weighs approximately 500 kg and is 1'60 m. tall, has balanced and harmonious movements. It is docile but not submissive. It is ferocious but elegant; strong but majestic. O wonder professionals, enthusiasts and observers have an enduring fascination with this horse.

    Riding means getting into the countryside on a horse, an animal which, unlike man, was never cast from paradise.

    In search of this close link with nature, an increasing number of people visit one of the firms which specialise in organising horse rides. In fact, Andalusia is one of the most fascinating places to take a ride in the country. The weather, with warm temperatures even in winter, makes it enjoyable to explore the different landscapes and varied environments. Among them is Donana, a National Park in Heulva, which has pine, eucalyptus and cork oak forests as well as the most important marsh area in Europe. Thousands of birds, such as geese and flamingos, come from Europe every winter to nest in Donana, which is swarming with life and colour during the entire season.

    Another possibility is riding in the Romeria, where hundreds of people in their traditional dresses, horsemen and women, go on a pilgrimage to El Rocio.

    Special training underlines the magnificent elegance of the Spanish horse. This is especially evident in the Royal Riding School in Jerez, whose president since 1973 has been King Juan Carlos. The aim of the school is to preserve and improve the thoroughbred Spanish horse and also to transmit the typical artistic training which is surprisingly rich and expressive. To experience this, you only have to attend the show offered by the school every week. "Como bailan los caballos andaluces" is a symphony of movements, a choreography of classical and cowboy training where horsemen are dressed as in the 17th century and horses dance to the soundtrack played by the Royal Philarmonic Orchestra of London under the direct of Luis Cobos.

    This display of harmony and colour shows that the Andalusian horses are not only capable of doing the most difficult balancing exercises, but also of dancing to the sound of the music revealing an exquisite combination of strong character and sensitivity in every movement.

    This article was first published in the Andalucia Costa del Sol Magazine.



    Source: http://www.andalucia.com/magazine/english/ed7/horse.htm
    "Donau abric a Espanya, la malmenada Espanya
    que ahir abrigava el món,
    i avui és com lo cedre que veu en la muntanya
    descoronar son front"

    A la Reina de Catalunya

  3. #3
    EponaHá está desconectado Miembro novel
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    Re: Respuesta: History of the Andalusian Horse

    I appreciate that this site is not specifically dedicated to the horse; but at the moment you are my most direct link into Spain to help me with my research and project to promote a better knowledge of the Hispano-Arabe horse.
    Here in the Uk despite the Cria Caballar working to promote the breed for nearly 30 years it has sadly been doing this under the oppresion of the organisation solely set up to promote the PRE. So now we; the Hispano-Arabe owners/breeders are at last on our path to independant representation Hispano-Árabe UK Ltd Home page.
    The biggest problem for the promotion of this breed has been the availability of correct information outside of Spain; hence world wide this fabulous horse while having many fans does not actually have definative information readily available to correctly promote it. I have for some time spent hours translating Spanish articles wherever I can find them to provide information about these horses and hopefully raise public interest.
    Your article/forum discussion here talks about the founding of the Lippizaners and the Dancing Horses of Andalusia but I would be grateful for any specific information clarifying the eexact breeding of the Spanish mares sent from Jerez that founded the School in Vienna...European records only refer to them as Spanish horses but some data I have come across from Spain specifically identifies these original horses as being Hispano-Arabe?
    The Real Escuela Andaluza de Arte Escuestre publicises its Dancing Horses and in some visitor forum write ups I find reference to the horses ALL being "Carthusian Hispano-Arabe", however the school itself does not anywhere that I so far can find specifically make any mention of the horses used being Hispano-Arabe.
    Can anyone please help clarify the actual facts regarding the Dancing horses; both those in the past sent to Vienna and those dancing their hearts out in Jerez today. I would love very much to be able to include in my next articles about the Hispano-Arabe horse the role they play in Dancing for Spain in these two establishments if the true facts can be sourced.
    Obviously any other information regarding this breed would be greatly appreciated to help in furthering a better world understanding and promotion of them.
    Última edición por Donoso; 01/11/2010 a las 17:23

  4. #4
    EponaHá está desconectado Miembro novel
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    Re: History of the Andalusian Horse

    Libros antiguos y de colección en IberLibro
    "It can only be the whims of changing fashion that, for the moment, deny him his place in competitive dressage - that and perhaps the extraordinarily extravagant and high action of his forelegs" suggests Elwyn Hartley Edwards in his engaging book, "Horses, their Role in the History of Man". The Andalusian does, in fact, "dish" - throw his forelegs in an outward arc before putting his feet to the ground. In Spain, the action is highly esteemed but in countries like England, it is not appreciated at all.

    Just as a note Piyayo my late and exceptional Hispano-
    Árabe stallion competed in 'English' dressage when he was still owned in Spain and here in the UK with me; he regularly 'thrashed' English thoroughbreds in dressage regardless of his extravigant action!

    As for the outward arc it is related to the ability to turn on a sixpence around one foot at tremendous speed ...something these horses depend upon to complete the amazing spins vital to their work around cattle or in the bullring.

    If it was selected/bred out of them just to perfect the breed for "English" taste then the breed would fail in the very work that has ensured its creation, development and survival. A "dish" is only a fault if it hinders a horse in its movement/function; if as in the case of these horses it is integral to it role then it is not a fault.

    All to often man tampers with breeds for aesthetic design and disregards the function and purpose for which those traits naturally were selected ; the consequence of that is all to often seen in English show rings!

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