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Tema: Castros’ repression against the dissidents

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    Castros’ repression against the dissidents

    Protest marchers beaten, detained
    http://www.miamiherald.com/2010/11/02/1903584/protest-marchers-beaten-detained.html

    Cuban authorities cracked down on a march Sunday to pray at the tomb of a dissident whose death became a rallying cry for human rights activists.


    BY JUAN O. TAMAYO
    jtamayo@ElNuevoHerald.com
    Posted on Tuesday, 11.02.10

    Cuban security agents beat and detained about 40 dissidents after the mother of the late political prisoner Orlando Zapata Tamayo and her supporters prayed at his tomb, activists reported Monday.

    The mother, Reina Luisa Tamayo, said she was repeatedly hit on the head, thrown to the ground and gagged with a smelly rag that left her breathless as she shouted anti-government slogans.

    Security officers also kicked several handcuffed young men during the incident Sunday, added Marlon Martorell, a dissident who took part in the protest.

    Tamayo and most of the 40 others detained were released later Sunday or early Monday but some remained unaccounted for Monday afternoon, including one of Tamayo's sons, Martorell reported.

    The detentions appeared to be one of the harshest crackdowns yet on supporters of Tamayo, whose son's death in February after a lengthy hunger strike became a rallying cry for dissidents in Cuba and abroad.

    Tamayo and Martorell said about 40 supporters joined the regular Sunday march from her home in the eastern town of Banes to Mass at a local Catholic church and to the cemetery where her son is buried.

    The mother said groups of government supporters harassed them on the way from church to the cemetery, and one man ``authorized by the state security'' threw rocks at the marchers, hitting at least three.

    Martorell also reported that a ``security agent in civilian clothes'' shouted epithets and threw rocks at the marchers. Some of the marchers threw rocks back, he said by phone from Banes, but kept walking toward the cemetery.

    Scores of police and state security officers ringed the cemetery by the time the marchers had finished praying at Zapata's tomb, Tamayo and Martorell said. ``They attacked when I set foot outside the gates to the cemetery,'' Tamayo told the Miami-based Cuban Democratic Directorate. ``They threw me to the ground and dealt blows and kicks to all the brothers.''

    Martorell said agents carried out the crackdown ``with a lot of violence, with beatings for all.''

    Tamayo, who is Afro-Cuban, said she was forced into a police vehicle and as she shouted ``Down with Fidel!'' one officer shouted at her, ``Shut up, you lousy black.'' She was then gagged with a rag smelling of gasoline that nearly asphyxiated her, the mother added.

    Police threw the protesters into two waiting buses, Martorell said, and he later heard Tamayo shouting ``Down with Fidel'' and ``Zapata Lives!'' while they were held in a Banes lockup.

    ``Once again, there's proof that they are a bunch of murderers,'' Tamayo added. ``Let them kill me, but I will die with honor, dignity and valor.''

    The Miami-based group Cuba Independent and Democratic reported Monday that one of its members in Banes, Daniel Mesa, suffered an injury to his hand during the detentions.

    The cell phones of Tamayo and those of several other supporters involved in the incident appeared to have been blocked Sunday afternoon and much of Monday.

    State Security agents initially blocked Tamayo's marches to the church and cemetery, sometimes with mass detentions like Sunday's. But they had been allowing the protests since mid-August, when Catholic church officials intervened on her behalf.

    Church officials told Tamayo last month that she and her immediate family had government permission to leave for the United States, but she replied that she would not leave unless she was allowed to take her son's remains.
    While the news media was reporting the latest "reforms" being implemented by Raul Castro, Reina Luisa Tamayo and 40 other dissidents were getting brutally beaten in the town of Banes, Holguin (Oriente) province. They were being stoned and rounded up like cattle.Banes was the birthplace of Fulgencio Batista, located about 20 miles north from the small town of Biran. Fidel Castro birthplace.

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    Re: Castros’ repression against the dissidents

    Cuban dissidents say cops again beat women
    http://www.miamiherald.com/2011/08/15/2360783/cuban-dissidents-say-cops-again.html

    For the fourth week, security forces in Santiago halt Ladies in White

    By Juan O. Tamayo
    Augusts 18, 2911

    Cuban dissidents complained that security forces blocked about 20 supporters of the Ladies in White from reaching a church service Sunday in the eastern city of Santiago, including nine women who were beaten and humiliated.


    The incidents marked the fourth weekend in a row that authorities have used physical force and even violence to break up the women’s attempt to establish their right to protest in eastern Cuba, just as the Women in White do after Sunday mass in Havana to demand the release of all political prisoners on the island.

    “Let’s see who tires first. Those who fight for democracy or those who receive a salary,” José Daniel Ferrer García, a recently freed political prisoner, said by phone from his home in Palmarito del Cauto, about 15 miles from Santiago.

    Ferrer said his wife, Belkis Cantillo, was in the group of nine women most seriously pummeled when the truck that was carrying them to mass at the Santiago cathedral was stopped by a large group of police and women prison guards at El Cristo, a traffic checkpoint seven miles from the city.

    “I was grabbed by six very large women who threw me off the truck. Two others were waiting for me below. They put me on the patrol car, and inside two male officers started to hit me and pull my hair,” Cantillo told Radio Martí.

    When the patrol car carrying Cantillo broke down on the way to Palmarito, she refused to transfer to another car and was again hit by a policeman who also flashed his penis as a way to humiliate the women, Ferrer and Cantillo added.

    Police also detained another seven Ladies in White supporters before they could get to the cathedral, including three who tried to sneak out of their homes around 2 a.m. in hopes of evading the security forces, Ferrer reported. One of the women fainted when confronted with a police guard dog.

    Only three women managed to attend the 9 a.m. mass, officiated by Santiago Archbishop Dionisio Garcia. They told him that the archbishop had condemned the violence against the women in his homily, Ferrer noted.

    The women intercepted at El Cristo were driven back to their hometowns in Palmarito, Palma Soriano, Guantanamo and Holguin, Ferrer told El Nuevo Herald, although some were dropped off at local police stations and only then sent home.

    Afterwards, eight government opponents were slightly injured as police and crowds of government supporters harassed three homes of dissidents near Santiago, where the women and others had gathered, to prevent them from staging protests on their streets.

    Ten had gathered in a home in the fruit-growing town of El Caney, 41 in Palma Soriano and 18 in Palmarito, Ferrer added.

    After several hours, police officials offered to allow the dissidents to leave the homes if they would promise to return to their own homes. The dissidents refused, and the security forces eventually tired and left, Ferrer reported.

    Police violence against the dissidents appears to have increased since April, when Cuban ruler Raúl Castro declared at a Communist Party congress that Cubans “will never deny the peoples’ right to defend the revolution.”
    The Damas de Blanco (Ladies in White) are a group in Cuba of the wives and other relatives of jailed dissidents. They have been protesting the imprisonments of their husbands by going to Mass each Sunday dressed in white and silently walking through the streets. The white color of the dresses is used as a symbol of peace. In 2005 they were awarded the Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought.

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    Re: Castros’ repression against the dissidents

    These attacks against people participating in peaceful protest keep happening all around Cuba. The all good and well trained progressives never admit the existence of truth when it is not convenient for them.They can’t refute it because they know there is no way they can hide what is happening in Dr. Castro’s island paradise that they support so much.

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    Re: Castros’ repression against the dissidents

    Ladies in White again attacked in Cuba
    http://www.bellinghamherald.com/2011/08/19/2148506/ladies-in-white-again-attacked.html

    By JUAN O. TAMAYO
    August 19, 2011

    MIAMI Cuban government supporters attacked more than 40 members and supporters of Ladies in White in what a spokeswoman called the worst violence against the Havana group since the Catholic Church interceded on their behalf in the spring.

    Spokeswoman Berta Soler said the mob punched, slapped and kicked the women, spit on them, pulled their hair and ripped some of their clothes to break up the women's attempt to stage a street protest Thursday.

    Several of the 42 women who were attacked reported bruises on their arms and legs but none required medical treatment, Soler and Ladies in White leader Laura Pollan reported Friday by phone from their homes in Havana.

    Pollan said the women left her home after their monthly gathering for a "literary tea" for a march to protest violent attacks on the Ladies in White branch in the eastern city of Santiago over the past four weeks.

    Forty-seven women had gathered at the house but five did not go out because of age and health issues, she said. Another eight women were detained and taken away by police near her house Thursday morning to keep them from joining the gathering. They were freed later.

    Soler said Thursday's attack was the harshest in Havana since March of last year, when the Catholic Church urged the government to halt an increasingly violent string of aggressions against the women during their regular Sunday protests.

    "This was a very violent act by the government," she said, adding that the harassments against the Ladies in White, who demand the release of all political prisoners, have been growing more violent since December.

    Cuban dissidents are reporting increased government repression across the island this year, amid speculation that the government is applying a tough hand as it tries to enact ambitious and risky reforms to overhaul the island's economy.

    "I think the government feels that it is lost and has no options, and is using these terrorist actions against a defenseless population" to keep Cubans in check, Soler said.

    Soler said the men in plainclothes who directed Thursday's mob were known to the women as officers of the so-called Confrontation Department, the branch of the Interior Ministry in charge of tracking dissidents and averting their activities.
    The Ladies in White, who won the prestigious Sakharov human rights prize in 2005, want to urge Catholic Cardinal Jaime Ortega to intercede as he did last year, Soler said. But he's out of the country and not expected back until after Aug. 23.

    Ortega's intercession meant the Havana women are the only dissidents allowed to stage regular street protests - every Sunday after Mass at the Santa Rita church - by a government that has long claimed "the streets belong to Fidel" Castro.

    Government-organized mobs have used violence to keep the women's branch in Santiago, Cuba's second-largest city, from marching after Mass there in what members acknowledge is a campaign to win their own right to take to the streets.

    An editorial Friday in the Boston Globe newspaper, meanwhile, noted that Syria is not the only place where "dictatorial rulers have been bloodying their critics" and criticized the attacks by "pro-government goons" against the Ladies in White.

    Castro "has nothing to fear from them but their integrity and moral authority. That, however, they have in abundance, while the ruthless regime over which Castro and his brother Fidel have presided for more than half a century has long since lost any claim to the respect or admiration of the free world," it added.

    A Cuban website, meanwhile, published a column saying that a machete attack on a dissident in Guantanamo last month was the "spontaneous" work of a government supporter and was not ordered by the government.

    Ernesto Carrera Moreno was hospitalized with a cracked skull after he was attacked by a man identified as an official in the municipal directorate of the Committees for the Defense of the Revolution.

    The column said Cuban security forces do intervene to protect dissidents "from the people's anger" but added: "Nevertheless, there is a reality: Our people will always respond to any provocation that offends their principles and damages the peace of citizens."

    The column was signed by Percy Francisco Alvarado Godoy, a Guatemalan living in Havana who has acknowledged working for Cuban intelligence. It was published on the website of the government-run Radio Habana
    The regime apologists blame the attacks on the supporters of the Ladies in White, not in the violence of the goons and thugs prompted by Raúl Castro speech at the sixth communist party congress saying that “it is necessary to make clear that we will never deny the peoples’ right to defend the revolution. The defense of the independence, of the conquests of Socialism and of our streets and plazas will still be the first duty of every Cuban patriot." The regime apologists are very predictable, blame the victim not the aggressor. .

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    Re: Castros’ repression against the dissidents

    Castro vs. the Ladies in White
    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424053111904875404576530302503295010.html

    By MARY ANASTASIA O'GRADY
    August 29, 2011
    Rocks, iron bars and sticks are no match for the gladiolas and courage of these peaceful Cuban protesters.

    Rocks and iron bars were the weapons of choice in a government assault on a handful of unarmed women on the outskirts of Santiago de Cuba on the afternoon of Aug. 7. According to a report issued by the Paris-based International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH), the beatings were savage and "caused them injuries, some considerable."

    It was not an isolated incident. In the past two months attacks on peaceful women dissidents, organized by the state security apparatus, have escalated. Most notable is the intensity with which the regime is moving to try to crush the core group known as the Ladies in White.

    This is not without risk to the regime, should the international community decide to pay attention and apply pressure on the white-elite regime the way it did in opposition to apartheid in South Africa. But the decision to take that risk suggests that the 52-year-old dictatorship in Havana is feeling increasingly insecure. The legendary bearded macho men of the "revolution," informed by the trial of a caged Hosni Mubarak in an Egyptian courtroom, apparently are terrified by the quiet, prayerful, nonviolent courage of little more than 100 women. No totalitarian regime can shrug off the fearless audacity these ladies display, or the signs that their boldness is spreading.

    ED-AO145_amcol0_D_20110827133116.jpgThe Castro brothers' goons are learning that they will not be easily intimidated. Take, for example, what happened that same Aug. 7 morning in Santiago: The women, dressed in white and carrying flowers, had gathered after Sunday Mass at the cathedral for a silent procession to protest the regime's incarceration of political prisoners. Castro supporters and state security officials, "armed with sticks and other blunt objects," according to FIDH, assaulted the group both physically and verbally. The ladies were then dragged aboard a bus, taken outside the city and dropped off on the side of a highway.

    Some of them regrouped and ventured out again in the afternoon, this time to hold a public vigil for their cause. That's when they were met by another Castro onslaught. On the same day thugs set upon the homes of former political prisoner José Daniel Ferrer and another activist. Six people, including Mr. Ferrer's wife and daughter, were sent to the hospital with contusions and broken bones, according to FIDH.

    The Ladies in White first came on the scene in the aftermath of the infamous March 2003 crackdown in which 75 independent journalists and librarians, writers and democracy advocates were rounded up and handed prison sentences of six to 28 years. The wives, mothers and sisters of some of them began a simple act of protest. On Sundays they would gather at the Havana Cathedral for Mass and afterward they would march carrying gladiolas in a silent call for the prisoners' release.

    In 2005 the Ladies in White won Europe's prestigious Sakharov prize for their courage. Cellphones that caught the regime's brutality against them on video helped get their story out. By 2010 they had so embarrassed the dictatorship internationally that a deal was struck to deport their imprisoned loved ones along with their family to Spain.

    But some prisoners refused the deal and some of the ladies stayed in Cuba. Others joined them, calling themselves "Ladies in Support." The group continued its processions following Sunday Mass in Havana, and women on the eastern end of the island established the same practice in Santiago.

    Laura Pollan, whose husband refused to take the offer of exile in Spain and was later released from prison, is a key member of the group. She and her cohorts have vowed to continue their activism as long as even one political prisoner remains jailed. Last week I spoke with her by phone in Havana, and she told me that when the regime agreed to release all of the 75, "it thought that the Ladies in White would disappear. Yet the opposite happened. Sympathizers have been joining up. There are now 82 ladies in Havana and 34 in Santiago de Cuba." She said that the paramilitary mobs have the goal of creating fear in order to keep the group from growing. But the movement is spreading to other parts of the country, places where every Sunday there are now marches.

    This explains the terror that has rained down on the group in Santiago and surrounding suburbs on successive Sundays since July and on other members in Havana as recently as Aug. 18.

    Last Tuesday, when four women dressed in black took to the steps of the capitol building in Havana chanting "freedom," a Castro bully tried to remove them. Amazingly, the large crowd watching shouted for him to leave them alone. Eventually uniformed agents carried them off. But the incident, caught on video, is evidence of a new chapter in Cuban history, and it is being written by women. How it ends may depend heavily on whether the international community supports them or simply shields its eyes from their torment.
    You have to be blind to defend a regime that treat and abuse these peaceful women like criminals. If you still have a mother or grandmother about the same age of “The Ladies in White”, you would probably have to stop the way you think and analyze yourself seriously.

    Is it right for these women to receive this kind of beating? These women already suffer enough punishment for having their love ones behind bars for exercising their freedoms.

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    Re: Castros’ repression against the dissidents

    You have to be blind to defend a regime that treat and abuse these peaceful women like criminals. If you still have a mother or grandmother about the same age of “The Ladies in White”, you would probably have to stop the way you think and analyze yourself seriously.

    Is it right for these women to receive this kind of beating? These women already suffer enough punishment for having their love ones behind bars for exercising their freedoms.

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    Re: Castros’ repression against the dissidents

    Ladies in White again attacked in Cuba
    http://www.bellinghamherald.com/2011/08/19/2148506/ladies-in-white-again-attacked.html

    By JUAN O. TAMAYO
    August 19, 2011

    MIAMI Cuban government supporters attacked more than 40 members and supporters of Ladies in White in what a spokeswoman called the worst violence against the Havana group since the Catholic Church interceded on their behalf in the spring.

    Spokeswoman Berta Soler said the mob punched, slapped and kicked the women, spit on them, pulled their hair and ripped some of their clothes to break up the women's attempt to stage a street protest Thursday.

    Several of the 42 women who were attacked reported bruises on their arms and legs but none required medical treatment, Soler and Ladies in White leader Laura Pollan reported Friday by phone from their homes in Havana.

    Pollan said the women left her home after their monthly gathering for a "literary tea" for a march to protest violent attacks on the Ladies in White branch in the eastern city of Santiago over the past four weeks.

    Forty-seven women had gathered at the house but five did not go out because of age and health issues, she said. Another eight women were detained and taken away by police near her house Thursday morning to keep them from joining the gathering. They were freed later.

    Soler said Thursday's attack was the harshest in Havana since March of last year, when the Catholic Church urged the government to halt an increasingly violent string of aggressions against the women during their regular Sunday protests.

    "This was a very violent act by the government," she said, adding that the harassments against the Ladies in White, who demand the release of all political prisoners, have been growing more violent since December.

    Cuban dissidents are reporting increased government repression across the island this year, amid speculation that the government is applying a tough hand as it tries to enact ambitious and risky reforms to overhaul the island's economy.

    "I think the government feels that it is lost and has no options, and is using these terrorist actions against a defenseless population" to keep Cubans in check, Soler said.

    Soler said the men in plainclothes who directed Thursday's mob were known to the women as officers of the so-called Confrontation Department, the branch of the Interior Ministry in charge of tracking dissidents and averting their activities.
    The Ladies in White, who won the prestigious Sakharov human rights prize in 2005, want to urge Catholic Cardinal Jaime Ortega to intercede as he did last year, Soler said. But he's out of the country and not expected back until after Aug. 23.

    Ortega's intercession meant the Havana women are the only dissidents allowed to stage regular street protests - every Sunday after Mass at the Santa Rita church - by a government that has long claimed "the streets belong to Fidel" Castro.

    Government-organized mobs have used violence to keep the women's branch in Santiago, Cuba's second-largest city, from marching after Mass there in what members acknowledge is a campaign to win their own right to take to the streets.

    An editorial Friday in the Boston Globe newspaper, meanwhile, noted that Syria is not the only place where "dictatorial rulers have been bloodying their critics" and criticized the attacks by "pro-government goons" against the Ladies in White.

    Castro "has nothing to fear from them but their integrity and moral authority. That, however, they have in abundance, while the ruthless regime over which Castro and his brother Fidel have presided for more than half a century has long since lost any claim to the respect or admiration of the free world," it added.

    A Cuban website, meanwhile, published a column saying that a machete attack on a dissident in Guantanamo last month was the "spontaneous" work of a government supporter and was not ordered by the government.

    Ernesto Carrera Moreno was hospitalized with a cracked skull after he was attacked by a man identified as an official in the municipal directorate of the Committees for the Defense of the Revolution.

    The column said Cuban security forces do intervene to protect dissidents "from the people's anger" but added: "Nevertheless, there is a reality: Our people will always respond to any provocation that offends their principles and damages the peace of citizens."

    The column was signed by Percy Francisco Alvarado Godoy, a Guatemalan living in Havana who has acknowledged working for Cuban intelligence. It was published on the website of the government-run Radio Habana.
    The regime apologists blame the attacks on the supporters of the Ladies in White, not in the violence of the goons and thugs prompted by Raúl Castro speech at the sixth communist party congress saying that “it is necessary to make clear that we will never deny the peoples’ right to defend the revolution. The defense of the independence, of the conquests of Socialism and of our streets and plazas will still be the first duty of every Cuban patriot." The regime apologists are very predictable, blame the victim not the aggressor.

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    Re: Castros’ repression against the dissidents

    Castro vs. the Ladies in White
    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424053111904875404576530302503295010.html

    By MARY ANASTASIA O'GRADY
    August 29, 2011
    Rocks, iron bars and sticks are no match for the gladiolas and courage of these peaceful Cuban protesters.

    Rocks and iron bars were the weapons of choice in a government assault on a handful of unarmed women on the outskirts of Santiago de Cuba on the afternoon of Aug. 7. According to a report issued by the Paris-based International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH), the beatings were savage and "caused them injuries, some considerable."

    It was not an isolated incident. In the past two months attacks on peaceful women dissidents, organized by the state security apparatus, have escalated. Most notable is the intensity with which the regime is moving to try to crush the core group known as the Ladies in White.

    This is not without risk to the regime, should the international community decide to pay attention and apply pressure on the white-elite regime the way it did in opposition to apartheid in South Africa. But the decision to take that risk suggests that the 52-year-old dictatorship in Havana is feeling increasingly insecure. The legendary bearded macho men of the "revolution," informed by the trial of a caged Hosni Mubarak in an Egyptian courtroom, apparently are terrified by the quiet, prayerful, nonviolent courage of little more than 100 women. No totalitarian regime can shrug off the fearless audacity these ladies display, or the signs that their boldness is spreading.

    http://si.wsj.net/public/resources/images/ED-AO145_amcol0_D_20110827133116.jpg

    The Castro brothers' goons are learning that they will not be easily intimidated. Take, for example, what happened that same Aug. 7 morning in Santiago: The women, dressed in white and carrying flowers, had gathered after Sunday Mass at the cathedral for a silent procession to protest the regime's incarceration of political prisoners. Castro supporters and state security officials, "armed with sticks and other blunt objects," according to FIDH, assaulted the group both physically and verbally. The ladies were then dragged aboard a bus, taken outside the city and dropped off on the side of a highway.

    Some of them regrouped and ventured out again in the afternoon, this time to hold a public vigil for their cause. That's when they were met by another Castro onslaught. On the same day thugs set upon the homes of former political prisoner José Daniel Ferrer and another activist. Six people, including Mr. Ferrer's wife and daughter, were sent to the hospital with contusions and broken bones, according to FIDH.

    The Ladies in White first came on the scene in the aftermath of the infamous March 2003 crackdown in which 75 independent journalists and librarians, writers and democracy advocates were rounded up and handed prison sentences of six to 28 years. The wives, mothers and sisters of some of them began a simple act of protest. On Sundays they would gather at the Havana Cathedral for Mass and afterward they would march carrying gladiolas in a silent call for the prisoners' release.

    In 2005 the Ladies in White won Europe's prestigious Sakharov prize for their courage. Cellphones that caught the regime's brutality against them on video helped get their story out. By 2010 they had so embarrassed the dictatorship internationally that a deal was struck to deport their imprisoned loved ones along with their family to Spain.

    But some prisoners refused the deal and some of the ladies stayed in Cuba. Others joined them, calling themselves "Ladies in Support." The group continued its processions following Sunday Mass in Havana, and women on the eastern end of the island established the same practice in Santiago.

    Laura Pollan, whose husband refused to take the offer of exile in Spain and was later released from prison, is a key member of the group. She and her cohorts have vowed to continue their activism as long as even one political prisoner remains jailed. Last week I spoke with her by phone in Havana, and she told me that when the regime agreed to release all of the 75, "it thought that the Ladies in White would disappear. Yet the opposite happened. Sympathizers have been joining up. There are now 82 ladies in Havana and 34 in Santiago de Cuba." She said that the paramilitary mobs have the goal of creating fear in order to keep the group from growing. But the movement is spreading to other parts of the country, places where every Sunday there are now marches.

    This explains the terror that has rained down on the group in Santiago and surrounding suburbs on successive Sundays since July and on other members in Havana as recently as Aug. 18.

    Last Tuesday, when four women dressed in black took to the steps of the capitol building in Havana chanting "freedom," a Castro bully tried to remove them. Amazingly, the large crowd watching shouted for him to leave them alone. Eventually uniformed agents carried them off. But the incident, caught on video, is evidence of a new chapter in Cuban history, and it is being written by women. How it ends may depend heavily on whether the international community supports them or simply shields its eyes from their torment.
    Many in the mainstream media remain silent on the assault by mobs organized by the state security of the regime against the Ladies in White. These peaceful ladies are asking only that their cause be acknowledged and the repression expose.

    The majority of the people depend mostly on the mainstream media for their news, but thanks to ideological blinders of many in the mainstream media remain they know very little about the attacks by the Castros’ goons against the peaceful Cuban dissidents.

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    Re: Castros’ repression against the dissidents

    You have to be blind to defend a regime that treat and abuse these peaceful women like criminals. If you still have a mother or grandmother about the same age of “The Ladies in White”, you would probably have to stop the way you think and analyze yourself seriously.

    Is it right for these women to receive this kind of beating? These women already suffer enough punishment for having their love ones behind bars for exercising their freedoms.

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    Re: Castros’ repression against the dissidents

    A strike by Pakistani students in Cuba drew a show of force from an anti-riot squad not seen before on the streets of the island.

    BY JUAN O. TAMAYO

    jtamayo@elnuevoherald.com

    Posted on Friday, 09.10.10

    A Cuban anti-riot squad, previously unseen but surprisingly well-equipped and with fixed bayonets, quelled a Pakistani student protest in Matanzas, a video of the event shows.

    Riot police halts student protest in Matanzas, Cuba
    This is a forerunner of things to come.On September 08, 2010, a Pakistanis students strike, complaining about the quality of their medical education, was put down by the regime anti-riot squad.

    The reasons riot police didn't use force against the students was that the protest wasn’t violent and they were afraid to been recorded and posted in the internet for the whole world to see. If the students have started to throw rocks and bottles, the riot police would have used whatever methods to squelch it. As they said it in the video, “Our hand will not tremble in the face of violence.”

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    Re: Castros’ repression against the dissidents

    The cell phone video shows Pakistanis medical students besieged by Cuban security dressed in full riot gear and assault rifles with fixed bayonets. Bayonets, other than in drill an ceremonial occasions, are used as a weapon in close combat. To some extent it seems extreme this show of force against unarmed students.

  12. #12
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    Re: Castros’ repression against the dissidents

    On Cuba’s Capitol Steps
    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424053111904875404576532563030650924.html?mod=googlenews_wsj

    Four women speak the unspeakable.
    Opinion
    August 27, 2011

    The four Cuban women who took to the steps of the capitol in Havana last week chanting "liberty" for 40 minutes weren't exactly rebel forces. But you wouldn't know that by the way the Castro regime reacted. A video of the event shows uniformed state security forcibly dragging the women to waiting patrol cars. They must have represented a threat to the regime because they were interrogated and detained until the following day.
    The video of the incident recorded an unprecedented show of vocal support from the people for the four women staging the protest. Normally passersby don’t get involve since they fear the crackdown of state security agents and government mobs. The Cuban people are showing more sings that they are on the side of the dissidents.


  13. #13
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    Re: Castros’ repression against the dissidents

    The four women are exercising their right to freedom of speech. The tyranny is getting more nervous since the tweets of what is happening in Egypt, Libya and Syria are been send to cell phones in Cuba, and people around the world are watching.

  14. #14
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    Re: Castros’ repression against the dissidents

    New Videos: Crowds Defend Pro-Democracy Activists
    Faces of Repression
    http://www.capitolhillcubans.com/2011/08/new-videos-crowds-defend-democracy.html

    at 1:36 AMSaturday, August 27, 2011

    Yesterday, Cuban pro-democracy activists, Ivonne Mallesa Galano and Rosario Morales la Rosa, staged a street-corner protest in Havana.
    The two women protested during two hour against the Castros regime at the Cuatro Caminos Plaza in the center of Havana banging pots and pans, The onlookers, after the women arrest by the police, fallow them to the police station where they demonstrated their support for them shouting libertad (freedom), libertad, libertad. These incidents demonstrate that the Cuban people are losing fear of the Castros tyranny.

  15. #15
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    Re: Castros’ repression against the dissidents

    During the Pope's visit, a man shouts "Down with Communism" and is beat down by some in the crowd, no doubt Castro's agents.

    Tamakun dio el Víctor.

  16. #16
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    Re: Castros’ repression against the dissidents

    Dissidents say police used tear gas in a raid, beat women
    http://www.miamiherald.com/2011/08/29/v-fullstory/2380921/dissidents-say-police-used-tear.html

    For the first time in years, Cuban police used tear gas in a raid over the weekend. Women also accuse police of beating and sexually harassing them over.


    By Juan O. Tamayo
    jtamayo@elnuevoherald.com
    Posted on Monday, 08.29.11

    Cuban police used tear gas in a weekend raid against dissidents in eastern Santiago province, where State Security agents also pummeled and made obscene gestures at dissident women, opposition activists reported Monday.
    The riot squad came into th
    e house like it was a commando movie, because that’s never been seen in Cuba,” said YulieCQ Valverde, whose husband was one of the 27 dissidents detained during the raid Sunday on their home in the town of Palma Soriano.

    It was the first time in recent memory that Cuba was reported to have repressed political dissidents with tear gas and the riot squad, clad in black uniforms and carrying gas masks, shields, helmets, riot batons and tear gas launchers.

    But Sunday’s raid was only the latest in a string of reports of unusually strong protests and violent police crackdowns in Cuba, where the communist government has long kept an iron grip on domestic security.

    The latest reports came from dissidents and their relatives, and there was no way to independently confirm them. The government has not commented on the weekend incidents, and foreign journalists in Havana reported nothing about them.

    Most of the recent incidents took place in Santiago, where members and supporters of the Ladies in White have tried to gather Sundays at the cathedral in the city of Santiago to attend mass and then stage street marches demanding the release of all political prisoners.

    The worst incident this weekend came in the town of Palma Soriano, 18 miles to the northwest, where 27 men had gathered Sunday at the home of Marino Antomarchit for a street march protesting the violence against the Ladies in White and other police abuses.

    Before the men could hit the street, Valverde said, police sprayed tear gas through the front door and windows and riot squad members in gas masks rushed in, handcuffed the dissidents and took them away in a bus.

    “It was like the end of the world,” she said, adding that police also broke up much of her home’s furniture, tore up bedding, seized documents, computers, cameras, cell phones, notebooks and some wallets and ripped up some of the men’s T-shirts, which displayed the word “Change.”

    Valverde and José Daniel Ferrer, a dissident who said he watched part of the raid from a distance in order report on the event, told El Nuevo Herald that a fire truck was deployed during the raid, apparently to use its water hoses for crowd control if needed.

    Ferrer said he also saw police drag away four or five neighbors who shouted “bullies” and “murderers” at police. Antomarchit’s asthmatic 2 ½ year old daughter, Stefhani, was overcome by the tear gas and evacuated from the house through a window, he added.

    The dissidents remained in police detention as of Monday evening, Ferrer said, adding that he had also received reports that one of them, Ruben de Armas Adrouver, was beaten by police and received five stitches on his head.

    Ladies in White supporter Caridad Caballero, meanwhile, alleged police pummeled and sexually abused her and Marta Díaz Rondón on Saturday when they tried to travel from their homes in Holguín to Santiago for Sunday mass.

    Halfway into the 66-mile trip, police and State Security agents stopped their hired vehicle, dragged them out, shoved them into patrol cars and took them to a police station in nearby Bayamo, she reported.

    The police “were shouting at us the whole time, hitting us and making signs and gestures with their fingers that were horrible, grabbing their crotches, something sick, gross,” Caballero told El Nuevo Herald by phone from her home in Holguín.

    State Security agents urged the police in Bayamo to strip-search them, but the two women refused to take off their clothes, Caballero added. Police freed them Sunday and drove them back to Holguín.
    Ferrer also noted that top State security officers have been contacting him with oddly mixed messages about his fellow Santiago dissidents.

    “They told me to go slow, that I am losing some standing with people that support me,” he said, “but that they will jail as many people as needed to keep this from spinning out of their control.” He called the contacts “a trick to halt the protests.”

    Also on Sunday, police allegedly beat and detained 13 members and supporters of the Ladies in White who had gathered in a separate Palma Soriano home for an attempt to travel to Santiago for mass at the cathedral.

    The women were dragged into a bus that then dropped most of them off at several different locations, said Berta Soler, a spokeswoman for the Ladies in White. She was put on a bus back to her home in Havana, she told El Nuevo Herald before her cell phone went dead. Some remained late Monday in apparent detention.

    Dissidents Guillermo Cobas Reyes and Agustin Magdariaga were also detained Sunday in their hometown of El Caney, about four miles from Santiago, according to reports from opposition activists in the province.

    Jorge Luis Garcia Perez , a dissident in central Cuba also known as “Antunez,” also reported the weekend detentions of several opposition figures in the eastern province of Camaguey and the westernmost province of Pinar del Rio.

    Seven of Cuba’s best-known dissidents, meanwhile, issued a joint statement Monday demanding an end to the violence against the Ladies in White, their supporters and other peaceful dissidents.

    “Stop the punches and other abuses!” said the statement by Ferrer, Gisela Delgado Sablón, Guillermo Fariñas, René Gómez Manzano, Iván Hernández Carrillo, Héctor Palacios Ruiz and Elizardo Sánchez Santa Cruz.
    These protests aren’t something new they already started over a year ago. But their frequency, repression, and people participation have been steadily increasing. The residence where dissident members were seeking refuge was tear gassed in order to get them to come out and beaten by the Rapid Response Brigades. This video is another evidence of the growing and strengthening opposition movement in Cuba:

  17. #17
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    Re: Castros’ repression against the dissidents

    Castros’ regime is afraid of the people, and is willing to do anything in its power to control their protests. But every single act of repression against the people brings them closer to its demise. The oppression and repression of the Cuban people for the last 52 years is coming to an end.

  18. #18
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    Re: Castros’ repression against the dissidents

    New Video: Another Street-Corner Protest
    http://www.capitolhillcubans.com/201...r-protest.htmlat 9:05 PMTuesday, August 30, 2011

    A family gathers outside their home to chant "Libertad" ("Freedom") and "Justicia" ("Justice"):
    Activists continue street protests against the Castro brothers’ dictatorship. Some members of the community participated with the family in their protest.
    Última edición por Tamakun; 09/05/2012 a las 04:33

  19. #19
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    Re: Castros’ repression against the dissidents

    Cuba steps up attacks on dissidents, activists say
    http://edition.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/americas/08/31/cuba.dissidents/

    By the CNN Wire Staff
    September 1, 2011

    Havana, Cuba (CNN) -- Cuba has stepped up its harassment of dissidents in the eastern province of Santiago de Cuba, with authorities beating, gassing and arresting protesters critical of the Communist government, human rights activists said Wednesday.

    During the past five weekends, the government has strongly repressed peaceful protests in several eastern cities, said Elizardo Sanchez, the head of the island's unofficial Commission for Human Rights and National Reconciliation. In at least one case, in the town of Palma Soriano, forces used gas -- either pepper spray or tear gas -- against one family, Sanchez said.
    Among those targeted are the Ladies in White, a group of mothers, sisters and friends of jailed dissidents who hold regular marches, said Berta Soler, one of its founding members.
    "Starting on July 17, the government has been responsible for criminal, violent acts against women who only want to go to the church for Mass, to pray and ask for freedom for political prisoners," Soler told CNN.

    Demonstrations in the neighborhoods of El Cobre and Palmarita Soriano were also squelched violently, he said. In all, at least 65 men and women were arrested by the country's secret police, his commission said.

    In one of the most recent incidents, on Sunday morning, a group of female dissidents were beaten and detained as they headed to Mass at the Palma Soriano's cathedral, Sanchez said. In protest of this act, two dissident groups declared they would hold closed-door vigils in certain homes, he said.

    On Sunday evening, one of the homes was raided by riot police, Sanchez said. The government forces mistreated the 30 people at the home and destroyed many of the home's furnishings, he said.

    The Cuban government has not commented on the allegations. But Soler said she attended Sunday's protest, "and I was beaten just like them." She said she asked Cuba's Roman Catholic cardinal, Jaime Ortega, "to tell the government to stop the violent, repressive actions against the Ladies in White and also human rights activists."

    "Once again, we, the Ladies in White, will continue," Soler said. "As long as there are political prisoners, we will keep fighting for them."

    The ladies got a recent word of encouragement from popular Cuban singer Pablo Milanes, whose recent performance in Miami was met by protests by some exile groups. In an open letter to Miami radio commentator Edmundo Garcia, published online and excerpted in the Spanish newspaper El Nuevo Herald, Milanes called attacks on the women by pro-government demonstrators "vile" and "cowardly.''

    Soler said Milanes should keep up that criticism when he's back home.

    "For us, it's very good that Pablo Milanes showed solidarity or at least sensitivity to the pain that the Ladies in White and people in Cuba are suffering," she said. "It's very important that he return to Cuba and maintain it.
    "Well, well, at last the Castro National Network (CNN) started to report the protests, because until now their Havana Bureau had been silent about the protests by the dissidents. Look that independent news sources on the internet that have been reporting the protests motivated the agency to report it too.

  20. #20
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    Re: Castros’ repression against the dissidents

    Libros antiguos y de colección en IberLibro
    The Castros regime is and always has been a fraud, held together with propaganda that only the uninformed believes. Now it is being exposed for what it has always been and is coming apart at the seams.

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