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Tema: How Rent-a-mob Jihadis are Tormenting a Benighted Christian Minority in Syria

  1. #1
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    How Rent-a-mob Jihadis are Tormenting a Benighted Christian Minority in Syria

    How rent-a-mob jihadis are tormenting a benighted Christian minority in Bashar al-Assad's Syria


    A Tory MP says the West has failed its Christian friends under a brutal regime








    In January 1945, my mother, too young even for school, joined millions of other ethnic Germans fleeing westwards from Breslau as the Red Army advanced. My forefathers had lived in this region of Silesia (German since 1242) for at least nine generations that I know of. The forced repatriation - a process that might now be called ethnic cleansing - of my mother’s family and millions of other civilians from groups whose nationality would in future be inextricably linked to their ethnicity, was largely overlooked in the euphoria that swept the world at the end of World War II.

    They never returned.
    Now we are witnessing another wave of civilian displacement in the Middle East with hundreds of thousands of Christians being forced to flee as they are banished from their 2,000 year old homelands in today's remarkable surge in Arabian people power.
    Their fate has been largely forgotten as the global media attention has moved on from Egypt and Libya and encamped in Syria to watch the terrible bloodshed in Damascus, Houla, Aleppo and Homs. Innocent people on all sides are enduring awful hardship, death and torture; civil war does not discriminate between young and old, rich or poor. In the ghastly bloodletting we are now seeing, no one seems safe from the prospect of sudden death and destruction of property.
    Desperation

    Yet for the two million plus Syrian followers of Christ, whose lineage goes back 2000 years to St Paul’s proselytising in the first century AD, these are especially desperate times. Ethnic cleansing is an ugly phrase, but that's just what is going on right now for Christians in Syria. The unspeakable truth now is that the sizeable Christian communities in war-torn Syria are at greater threat of ethnic cleansing from their ancestral homes than has been the case for generations – often at the hands of the self-styled freedom fighters so feted by the Western press.
    These fighters, increasingly rent-a-mob Jihadists with no real stake in the affairs of Damascus, do not see the enclaves of Christians as genial neighbours who they have lived alongside for centuries, as many Syrian rebels do. It is true religious minorities often find their most assured protection under dictatorships. It pays not to rock the status quo.
    But to use this as a reason to attack them, destroy ancient churches and hold them to ransom seems a convenient excuse. The Jihadists simply see them as representing an infidel faith and have turned their attentions on them in a way that was so much rarer for the Syrian-based rebels. Syria's Christians, who make up less than 10 per cent of the estimated 23 million population, include Greek Orthodox, Syriac Orthodox, Maronite and Melkite Greek Catholic faithful.
    Already thousands have left, part of a larger tide of displaced Syrians escaping the conflict in which opposition groups say 27,000 people have died. In the Homs area 80,000 have fled as churches and community centres have been targeted, defaced, and their religious icons stolen. Whilst it is true that some Christians have held prominent positions under Assad they have also taken leading roles in the political opposition to Assad's rule, there are other Christians, like George Sabra, who ran for presidency of the opposition Syrian National Council, who have been staunchly anti-Assad.
    The Iraqi example

    These Christians are now abroad, staying with friends, in gardens or in churches in Lebanon, in Turkey, anywhere out of the firing line. Some have resorted to taking the Government's side and bearing arms, a move anathema to them throughout history. What my Syrian Christian constituents fear is that once gone, there will be no coming back. A rebel victory and a harder Islamist regime, may very well not want the return of a pluralist society, with Christians living alongside Shiite and Sunni Muslims as they have since biblical times.
    Events in Iraq provide us with a timely example. Amidst savage bloodletting between Sunnis and Shiites in the aftermath of the US-led invasion of Iraq in 2003, the story of Iraq’s Christian population is one that is rarely told. But since the invasion it is estimated that half their number has desperately been driven to exile outside the country.
    Some 330,000 Iraqi Christians fled in the past decade to Syria alone - and are now fleeing again. Others have found safe haven in Jordan and naturally some have come to these shores, including to my constituency, the Cities of London and Westminster. Under Saddam Hussein, some Christians had risen to the top of politics, most notably Tariq Aziz, Hussein’s Deputy Prime Minister. Yet since the dictator’s fall, violence against the Christian minority, who were often associated with the "crusading invaders", has included kidnappings, the beheading of a priest, the bombing of ancient churches and forced conversion to Islam.
    This is the backdrop to the fate that I fear will within a decade or so befall the long established Christian population in this region.
    The West must act now to protect the Christians of Syria, Egypt and Iraq and make sure religious freedoms for Christians are enshrined in the laws of any future new regimes if we wish to avoid a similar scale of civilian displacement. And we must ensure that the banishment from their homelands of Middle Eastern Christians over the years ahead is not a dark derivative of the Middle Eastern uprising.

    How rent-a-mob jihadis are tormenting a benighted Christian minority in Bashar al-Assad's Syria - Comment - Voices - The Independent
    Annuit Coeptis dio el Víctor.

  2. #2
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    Re: How Rent-a-mob Jihadis are Tormenting a Benighted Christian Minority in Syria

    Christianity and Islam simply cannot co-exist in the same place. Muslim aggression against the Christians goes back to the foundation of the religion itself, with the hateful rantings of the devil-worshipper-in-chief (Muhammed) as the origin and inspiration for this anti-Christian mentality. The Christian brethren in the various Middle Eastern countries such as Syria, so-called Palestine, and Lebanon have often suffered terribly at the hands of Muslims (as well as the Zionists in the areas adjacent to Israel). The indifference of Western Christians is appalling, especially in the US. Very few of my fellow Americans that I've quizzed about the Middle Eastern Christians seem to be even remotely concerned about them.
    Última edición por Annuit Coeptis; 17/10/2012 a las 04:50
    "And, as we Catholics know, Western Civilization is Roman Civilization, first classical Roman Civilization, then Roman Catholic Civilization, as the Christians preserved and carried classical Roman Civilization to the world in a Christianized form. That is, after all, why we are described as Roman Catholics."

  3. #3
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    Re: How Rent-a-mob Jihadis are Tormenting a Benighted Christian Minority in Syria

    Cita Iniciado por Annuit Coeptis Ver mensaje
    Christianity and Islam simply cannot co-exist in the same place. Muslim aggression against the Christians goes back to the foundation of the religion itself, with the hateful rantings of the devil-worshipper-in-chief (Muhammed) as the origin and inspiration for this anti-Christian mentality. The Christian brethren in the various Middle Eastern countries such as Syria, so-called Palestine, and Lebanon have often suffered terribly at the hands of Muslims (as well as the Zionists in the areas adjacent to Israel). The indifference of Western Christians is appalling, especially in the US. Very few of my fellow Americans that I've quizzed about the Middle Eastern Christians seem to be even remotely concerned about them.
    Hello Annuit,

    Despite of the intrinsic violence of islam - proclaimed by the quran and other islamic texts - it has been possible for christians and muslims to co-exist, for some historic periods. I don't mean to imply that those periods have been times of justice and charity, as it is required for peace to be, as a gift of the Lord: “Peace I leave with you, my peace I give unto you: not as the world giveth, give I unto you. Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid” (John 14:27). Yet, without that "minor" peace it would be impossible for those communities of Syrian and Lebanese Christians to survive the centuries and reach these dark and threatening days; as it would be to bring the word of God to the four corners of the world, as it was commanded by the Lord - And He said to them, “Go into all the world and proclaim the gospel to the whole creation. Whoever believes and is baptized will be saved, but whoever does not believe will be condemned" (Mark 16:15) - as it should be the main concern of any catholic (universalist christian). To that minor peace to be achieved - and major peace to be pursued - muslim leaders that at least tolerate minor peace, even if ill minded, are to be definitely supported by all Christian societies and, particularly, the Catholics. That's why Bashar al-Assad and his alauit regimen should earn our commitment and not the suni wahabist movements that oppose him, as it has been occurring.

    That's why I cannot agree with you, when you accuse islam to be the origin and aspiration of the anti-Christian mentality. In fact, that origin and aspiration lies within the actual and degenerated Christian mentality, which does not reflect its Tradition, neither does it comply with the Divine purpose it was instated for. How can Christianity be trusted and embraced, when it actually supports (not allows) the slaughter of entire Christian communities?
    Última edición por Irmão de Cá; 17/10/2012 a las 13:06
    Kontrapoder dio el Víctor.
    res eodem modo conservatur quo generantur
    SAGRADA HISPÂNIA
    HISPANIS OMNIS SVMVS

  4. #4
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    Re: How Rent-a-mob Jihadis are Tormenting a Benighted Christian Minority in Syria

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    Cita Iniciado por Irmão de Cá Ver mensaje
    Hello Annuit,

    Despite of the intrinsic violence of islam - proclaimed by the quran and other islamic texts - it has been possible for christians and muslims to co-exist, for some historic periods. I don't mean to imply that those periods have been times of justice and charity, as it is required for peace to be, as a gift of the Lord: “Peace I leave with you, my peace I give unto you: not as the world giveth, give I unto you. Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid” (John 14:27). Yet, without that "minor" peace it would be impossible for those communities of Syrian and Lebanese Christians to survive the centuries and reach these dark and threatening days; as it would be to bring the word of God to the four corners of the world, as it was commanded by the Lord - And He said to them, “Go into all the world and proclaim the gospel to the whole creation. Whoever believes and is baptized will be saved, but whoever does not believe will be condemned" (Mark 16:15) - as it should be the main concern of any catholic (universalist christian). To that minor peace to be achieved - and major peace to be pursued - muslim leaders that at least tolerate minor peace, even if ill minded, are to be definitely supported by all Christian societies and, particularly, the Catholics. That's why Bashar al-Assad and his alauit regimen should earn our commitment and not the suni wahabist movements that oppose him, as it has been occurring.
    It's still infuriating when I think of the indifference shown towards the Christians in the Middle East. The fact is is that dictators like the late Shah of Iran, Saddam Hussein, Hosni Mubarak, and Bashar al-Assad have done more for Christians in their countries than any Western leader due to strong tendencies of secularism. i.e. Mubarak largely continued the policies of Egyptian modernization of Nasser and Sadat. Tolerant or "lazy" Muslim rulers are often overthrown.

    The "Arab Spring" has seen the rise of Islamist groups- groups which are sometimes equipped, financed, and supporterd by the West for geopolitical gain. Should any Christian support the overthrowing of Christian-friendly leaders in the Middle East or is it better for Christians to be dhimmis? I do see your point but, to me, it is very distressing to see more American Christians concerned with the safety and welfare of the Zionist state than with the safety and welfare of their own Christian brethren in various Middle Eastern nations.

    That's why I cannot agree with you, when you accuse islam to be the origin and aspiration of the anti-Christian mentality. In fact, that origin and aspiration lies within the actual and degenerated Christian mentality, which does not reflect its Tradition, neither does it comply with the Divine purpose it was instated for. How can Christianity be trusted and embraced, when it actually supports (not allows) the slaughter of entire Christian communities?
    The origin of specifically Islamic anti-Christianism is traceable to the ravings of Muhammed. More generically the general anti-Christianism of the secular world is traceable to modernism or post-modernism, which has seen a variety of Christ-hating trends, subtle and not-so-subtle, arise. The West's falling away from Christianity has little to do with Islam, which has its own indigenous hatred of Christ's religion.
    "And, as we Catholics know, Western Civilization is Roman Civilization, first classical Roman Civilization, then Roman Catholic Civilization, as the Christians preserved and carried classical Roman Civilization to the world in a Christianized form. That is, after all, why we are described as Roman Catholics."

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