Búsqueda avanzada de temas en el foro

Página 3 de 5 PrimerPrimer 12345 ÚltimoÚltimo
Resultados 41 al 60 de 81

Tema: Causa Jacobita

  1. #41
    Avatar de Ordóñez
    Ordóñez está desconectado Puerto y Puerta D Yndias
    Fecha de ingreso
    14 mar, 05
    Ubicación
    España
    Edad
    39
    Mensajes
    10,255
    Post Thanks / Like

    Respuesta: Causa Jacobita

    ¡ Gracias paisano !

  2. #42
    Avatar de Ordóñez
    Ordóñez está desconectado Puerto y Puerta D Yndias
    Fecha de ingreso
    14 mar, 05
    Ubicación
    España
    Edad
    39
    Mensajes
    10,255
    Post Thanks / Like

  3. #43
    Avatar de Ordóñez
    Ordóñez está desconectado Puerto y Puerta D Yndias
    Fecha de ingreso
    14 mar, 05
    Ubicación
    España
    Edad
    39
    Mensajes
    10,255
    Post Thanks / Like

  4. #44
    Avatar de Ordóñez
    Ordóñez está desconectado Puerto y Puerta D Yndias
    Fecha de ingreso
    14 mar, 05
    Ubicación
    España
    Edad
    39
    Mensajes
    10,255
    Post Thanks / Like

    Respuesta: Causa Jacobita

    Celebrating a Great Scot: David Lumsden

    I can’t tell you how often I come across something and think to myself “I must ask Lumsden about that”, and then suddenly realise that no such thing is possible anymore. I only had the privilege of knowing this gentle giant of a man towards the end of his life, but am grateful even for that relatively short friendship. Below is the address given by Hugh Macpherson at the Thanksgiving Service for the Life of David Lumsden of Cushnie that took place at St. Mary’s Church, Cadogan St., London on Monday, 27th April 2009. May he rest in peace.
    It is difficult to mark the passing of such a remarkable personality as David Lumsden. We have done with the requiems and the pibrochs and must now look forward to celebrate an extraordinary life lived to the full.
    David was a man of many parts and passions. He was a renaissance man with a wide variety of interests, and if he did not know the answer to any particular question, he certainly knew where to look it up, and in a few days there would be an informative card in the post. He had a lively curiosity and sense of adventure.
    Perhaps the ruling passion in his younger life was that of rowing. He rowed at Bedford School and when he went up to Jesus College Cambridge, he joined the boat club, eventually becoming Captain of Boats. There were, I think, eventually eight “oars” on the walls of his various houses. I think that David was one of the few people I know who went to Henley to actually watch the racing, and when one went into the trophy tent his name could be found on some of the trophys. The expedition to Henley was one of the fixed points of David’s year.
    He travelled round the country rather like the “progress” of a monarch of old. This progress encompassed the Boat Race, Henley, the Royal Stuart Society Dinner, the Russian Ball, spring and autumn trips to Egypt, the Aboyne Games, the 1745 Commemoration, the Edinburgh Festival, and numerous balls and dinners, including of course the Sublime Society of Beef Steaks.
    Rather like clubs, David and I had a “reciprocal” arrangement: When I was in Scotland I lodged with him, and when he was in London he lodged with me, and I can tell you that there were many times when I simply could not keep up with his social whirl, in fact once or twice I distinctly fell off! I remember one particularly splendid and bibulous dinner at the House of Lords at which we were decked in evening dress and clanking with all sorts of nonsense — after many attempts to hail a taxi, David turned and said to me “You know we are so drunk they won’t pick us up. We’ll have to stagger back.” And so we wound a very unsteady path back to Pimlico, shedding the odd miniature en route.
    At Cambridge, David also formed a lasting friendship with Mgr. Alfred Gilbey, Catholic Chaplain to the University, who was to have a lasting influence on David’s faith and life, and, I think, introducing him to the Sovereign Military Order of Malta, where he eventually became a Knight of Honour & Devotion.
    David’s faith was an important part of his life. When he was in London he would attend this church on a Sunday morning to hear the 11.30 Latin Mass, which finished conveniently near to the opening time at one of his favourite watering holes in the Kings Road.
    After Cambridge, David joined the London Scottish Territorial Army regiment, and was enrolled as a graduate trainee by British American Tobacco. BAT sent him off to Switzerland to polish up his already considerable linguistic ability. This of course pointed to a career in the export division of BAT, which started in the Congo, where he was caught up in civil unrest and had to catch a plane out, with a shoot-out worthy of a Wild West movie. His subsequent travels took him to Hong Kong and Japan. He particularly liked Japan, where of course he was a giant! A large part of his life was spent travelling behind the Iron Curtain. He acquired fluency in Russian and some of the other Eastern European languages, adding to his German, French, and Italian.
    There were also work projects in India, which David relished, as of course he was born in Baluchistan (which is now part of Pakistan). One of his more amusing eccentricities was that on his British driving licence, when it came to “Place of Birth” he entered “Empire of India”. David’s father, Major Harry Lumsden, was continuing the family military tradition, serving in the Royal Scots in India when David was born. There is a long and distinguished Lumsden connection with India. In 1846, Lt. Gen. Sir Harry Burnett Lumsden raised the Lumsden Guides, a cavalry and infantry unit. In 1847, Sir Harry became rather tired of having his redcoats shot at, and devised a new uniform to blend in with the lighter surroundings. This became known as ‘khaki’, which derives from the Persian, meaning ‘dusty’, and remains as desert battledress today. There is a rather poignant resonance in these days, as the Lumsden Guides saw action in Afghanistan, particularly in the Helmand province. There was also a regiment called the Lumsden Horse, raised in Calcutta in 1899 by Col. Dugald Lumsden. So it is clear that travel and adventure were embedded in David’s genes.
    David’s most lasting legacy is to the architectural heritage of Scotland. From his boyhood, he immersed himself in the history of Scotland and its architecture. His special enthusiasm was for fortified towers and castles. His other great hobby, heraldry, ran in parallel with this, often with a castle or tower telling its history in heraldic carving as well as in its structure.
    When he retired from BAT, David was able to devote his time and energy to restoration projects. The first Lumsden of Cushnie, Robert, was granted a charter of land by King James IV in 1509. Cushnie House was built on that same land by Alexander Lumsden in 1688. By the time that David retired in 1970, the house had fallen into disrepair. David was able to acquire it and “put it back in the housing stock”, as he used to say. Encouraged by this, he went on to acquire Tillycairn Castle, built in 1540 by Matthew Lumsden. There was a considerable amount of heraldry in the stonework which David lovingly brought back to life. This was a major restoration project, as the castle had been roofless for many years. Then followed Liberton Tower in Edinburgh, which had retained its roof but was used to keep livestock in, and Leithen Lodge in the Borders which had trees growing out of the roof and was a candidate for demolition. In each case, it is doubtful if the buildings would have survived but for David’s timely intervention.
    Travelling round Scotland with David was an education. He knew almost every tower and castle, and was hot on the trail of the owners with a view to gaining permission to seek funding and carry out restoration. I once went with him to visit a ruined tower. As we were examining the great ruin, he said “You know, this sends shivers down my spine”. During the course of these renovations, David, along with the late Hugh Ross, Kenneth Ferguson, and Jessie Pettigrew, set up the Castles of Scotland Preservation Trust, which continues to do important work in restoration and preservation in Scotland.
    David revelled in the more traditional side of life in Scotland. He was a representative of the baronage of Scotland and appeared at the Kirking of the General Assembly in Edinburgh and in the St. Andrew’s Day Parade. He looked magnificent in his scarlet baronial robes with ermine trimmings. The ermine was specially brought from France — no nylon or rabbit here!
    In 1996, David was created Gairoch Pursuivant of Arms to the Countess of Mar. He was one of the four private pursuivants in Scotland and delighted in the role. The Mar tent at the Aboyne Games was famous for its hospitality. David would have been especially pleased that Lady Mar chose to appoint David’s nephew, Hugh de Laurier, as Gairoch Pursuivant to succeed him. By a strange coincidence, Hugh was christened in this very church.
    David had always the good fortune to live in large and beautiful houses. That was also the good fortune of his friends, as David was a king and generous host. He once remarked that big houses need to be filled by lots of people enjoying themselves. Well we certainly did!
    David was a big man in every sense. He did not seek the spotlight, and was content to work quietly behind the scenes, bringing people together and reconciling differing views, as many people in the clubs and societies that he belonged to will testify. He had a life-enhancing spirit which brightened many lives.
    There is a quotation which I think fits today perfectly: “It is wrong to mourn the men who die — rather, we should thank God that such men lived”.
    Let us then continue to celebrate the life of a great Scot.

    July 13, 2009 8:08 pm | Link | No Comments »

    Lumsden Requiem in Edinburgh


    Some good Christian soul was kind enough to put most of our friend David Lumsden’s funeral at St. Mary’s (Catholic) Cathedral in Edinburgh on YouTube. It was the first Latin requiem in the extraordinary form of the Mass held in the Cathedral for many decades — a fact which David would have particularly enjoyed. Of note is the address given by Robin Angus, embedded below, and of course Gerald Warner’s previously mentioned report should not be missed either.

    Read the rest of this entry »

    October 2, 2008 8:05 pm | Link | No Comments »

    ‘Feudal pomp and Latin Mass at funeral of a Scottish laird’

    Gerald Warner reports on the funeral of David Lumsden of Cushnie:
    Thursday, September 11, 2008
    To Edinburgh yesterday, for a melancholy but magnificent and uplifting occasion: the funeral of David Lumsden of Cushnie, Garioch Pursuivant of Arms, restorer of ancient castles and Jacobite romantic. It was held in the Catholic cathedral where, for the first time since Vatican II, the Latin Tridentine Mass was sung, thanks to the permissive rules of Benedict XVI in his motuproprio Summorum Pontificum.
    The coffin was draped in the banners of the Order of Malta and the deceased’s arms, with an heraldic hatchment and the decorations of the orders of chivalry to which he belonged. Knights of Malta and of the Constantinian Order processed behind their banner in mediaeval robes. The congregation was filled with peers, chieftains, lairds and splendid eccentrics, the pews awash with tartan. One of the tail-coated ushers was the grandson of a papal marquis. Robin Angus, whose day job is venture capitalist, dressed in the uniform of a papal Knight of St Sylvester, delivered a moving panegyric.
    This occasion was a potent reminder of an alternative Scotland, a different pulse from the vulgar, mean-minded, politically correct clones in the abysmal Scottish parliament at Holyrood. It was shamelessly feudal, aristocratic and colourful. Evelyn Waugh would have loved it; Harriet Harridan would have burst her stays. It was reminiscent of the scene in Waugh’s Sword of Honour when, at the funeral of old Mr Crouchback, the members of ancient Catholic Recusant families murmur their sonorous names while the narrator, parodying a wartime poster, concludes: “Their journey was really necessary.”
    At the subsequent reception, Lady Mar, whose personal herald David was and who came top of the ballot for the 92 surviving hereditary peers in the House of Lords, was pointedly addressed by Jacobites as “Your Grace”. This was because, although the British state recognises her as 30th Countess of Mar, her ancestor who led the Jacobite Rising of 1715 was created Duke of Mar by the exiled Stuart King James VIII.
    Only a few of these Jacobite peerages created by the Stuarts in exile have heirs today. Now that such hereditary peerages no longer bestow an automatic seat in Parliament, it would be a gracious gesture for the Crown to recognise them and so heal old historical wounds. There is a precedent: Spain has recognised the titles of nobility created by the Carlist claimants in exile – Carlism being the Spanish equivalent of Jacobitism.
    The dry-as-dust forms issued by government departments are normally very boring; but the most romantic document available online is issued by the Spanish Ministry of Justice, entitled Solicitud de Titulo Nobiliario por: Rehabilitacion/Reconocimiento de Titulo Carlista. It is the formal application for recognition of a title of nobility conferred by the Carlist kings in exile from 1833 to 1936. David Lumsden of Cushnie (RIP) would have appreciated it.

    September 11, 2008 10:20 pm | Link | 4 Comments »

    David Lumsden of Cushnie, 1933-2008

    Garioch Pursuivant of Arms, sometime Baron of Cushnie-Lumsden, Knight of Malta, Patron of the Aboyne Highland Games

    It was with great sadness that I learned this morning of the death of David Lumsden. He was an exceptionally genial and affable man, and was relied on to provide good company at many events, from balls to Sunday lunches and everything in between. But David was generous not only with his good company but with his patronage, as is attested to by the countless organizations he helped and guided. Here was a man who was generous of spirit. David’s death came very suddenly yesterday afternoon in his hotel room at the annual conference of the 1745 Association, of which he was president. Just last Sunday he had attended the traditional Mass at St. Andrew’s, Ravelston in Edinburgh, where a friend described him as “looking as hale and hearty as ever”.
    David Gordon Allen d’Aldecamb Lumsden of Cushnie, sometime Baron of Cushnie-Lumsden, was born on 25 May in 1933 in Quetta, Baluchistan in the Empire of India. He was the son of Henry Gordon Strange Lumsden, a Major in the Royal Scots, of Nocton Hall, Lincolnshire and Sydney Mary, only child of Brigadier-General Charles Allen Elliot.
    He was educated at Allhallows, Devon, Bedford School, and at Jesus College, Cambridge before serving in the Territorial Army with the London Scottish while working at British American Tobacco. He was a Knight of the Order of Malta, as well as of the Constantinian Order, and was Patron of the Aboyne Highland Games. David enthusiastically served as Garioch Pursuivant to the Chief of the Name and Arms of Mar (presently Margaret of Mar, the 30th Countess of Mar), one of the four surviving private officers of arms in Scotland recognised by the Court of the Lord Lyon.
    Lumsden with friends, at the Aboyne Highland Games.
    David co-founded the Castles of Scotland Preservation Trust and the Scottish Historic Organs Trust and was President of the Scottish Military History Society. In addition to his Magister Artium from Cambridge, he was a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. He was on the council of The Admiral the Viscount Keppel Association and was one of the patrons of the famous Russian Summer Ball in London. He was Convenor of the Monarchist League of Scotland and was on the council of the Royal Stuart Society.
    In the realm of sport, he was a keen shot and had rowed at Cambridge, in addition to his interest in sailing and riding.
    Left: Representing the Royal Stuart Society at the Henry IX commemoration at the Royal Hospital Chelsea. Right: In his capacity as Garioch Pursuivant of Arms, at the XXVIIth International Congress of Genealogical and Heraldic Sciences in 2006.
    David had a passion for architecture, and especially that of his native Scotland. Returning in 1970 after a spell in Africa, he undertook the restoration of two family properties: Cushnie House, built in 1688 by Alexander Lumsden and Tillycairn Castle, built in 1540 by Matthew Lumsden. He later went on to restore Leithen Lodge at Innerleithen, an 1880s shooting lodge built in a distinctly Scottish take on the Arts & Crafts tradition. Under the auspices of the Castles of Scotland Preservation Trust, in 1994 he oversaw the restoration of Liberton Tower just south of the Royal Observatory in Edinburgh.
    “David was a unique man possessed of an insatiable love of life and learning,” his friend Rafe Heydel-Mankoo said. “He will be deeply missed and fondly remembered by those fortunate enough to have met him.”
    “David was at the centre of so many things, and brought together so many different people,” said Lorna Angus, the wife of Robin Angus. “He could bring life to any gathering and he made so many good things possible.”
    Robin Angus, meanwhile, said that David Lumsden “personified a world of precious things — things which are imperilled, but which never seemed imperilled when he was there.”
    “David no longer visibly with us is unimaginable,” Robin continued. “What his friends must now do is keep the flame, and — as he did — pass it on to others with the same generous wisdom. He was the soul of old Scotland. I hope that, in Heaven, Raeburn will make amends for what the centuries did not allow, and paint his portrait.”
    While I wholeheartedly agree with Robin, it must be said that those who were blessed to know David are left with a portrait of him in our hearts and minds far greater than even the brush of Raeburn could achieve.
    David Gordon Allen d’Aldecamb Lumsden
    of Cushnie
    1933–2008
    “… hold fast to that which is good.”
    — 1.Thess 5:21
    Requiem aeternum dona eis Domine:
    et lux perpetua luceat eis.

    Requiescat in pace.

    August 30, 2008 3:00 pm | Link | 23 Comments »

  5. #45
    Avatar de Ordóñez
    Ordóñez está desconectado Puerto y Puerta D Yndias
    Fecha de ingreso
    14 mar, 05
    Ubicación
    España
    Edad
    39
    Mensajes
    10,255
    Post Thanks / Like

  6. #46
    Avatar de Reke_Ride
    Reke_Ride está desconectado Contrarrevolucionario
    Fecha de ingreso
    08 sep, 06
    Ubicación
    Antiguo Reyno de Valencia
    Mensajes
    2,931
    Post Thanks / Like

    Respuesta: Causa Jacobita

    GLENSHIEL o LA ÚLTIMA INVASIÓN ESPAÑOLA DEL REINO UNIDO (ESPAÑOLES Y ESCOCESES JACOBITAS VS. INGLESES)

    La armada invencible, no fue el único intento español de atacar a los ingleses en su propia tierra, las clausulas del tratado de Uthecht y la pérdida de las posesiones en Italia que España mantenía desde la corona de Aragón, motivaron el ultimo enfrentamiento en suelo ingles este estos y los españoles.

    Corría el año 1719 y España una vez más se encuentra en guerra, en esta ocasión contra cuatro enemigos, Inglaterra, Francia, Austria y Saboya, en lo que se denominaría la guerra de la cuádruple alianza, que comenzó Felipe V con el objetivo de recuperar los dominios españoles en Italia perdidos en el tratado de Utrecht.

    Toda esta campaña fue un gran fracaso español, que llego incluso a ver ocupada por los franceses las tres provincias vascas mientras los ingleses ocupaban Vigo durante cuatro semanas.

    Pero no son estos hechos los que queremos comentar, si no la incursión que un grupo de tropas españolas llevo acabo en Escocia.

    Aprovechando que el reino unido no estaba tan unido y se encontraba en medio de una guerra civil entre Jacobo III Estuardo, depuesto recientemente por Jorge I de Hannover, así como la existencia de revueltas nacionalistas escocesas, España prepara una invasión en apoyo de los jacobitas.

    El cardenal Giulio Alberoni, primer ministro de Felipe V, elabora un plan compuesto de dos faces, una primera en la que 300 españoles, desembarcarían en Escocia a fin de levantar a los clanes y a los leales jacobitas contra los ingleses a la vez que distraía el ejercito ingles en el norte.

    En una segunda fase 5.000 soldados desembarcarían en el oeste de Inglaterra donde los jacobitas tenían más influencia y donde esperaban organizar un gran ejército con el que atacar a Londres.

    Cuando todo estuvo listo a mediados de marzo una fuerza de 5.000 soldados zarpó de Cádiz rumbo a La Coruña embarcados en 27 buques de transporte escoltados por una pequeña escuadra de 2 navíos de guerra y 1 fragata

    En La Coruña debían de recoger al duque de Ormond, principal opositor de la nueva dinastía alemana británica, para que se pusiera al frente de la invasión de Escocia en nombre de Jacobo III. Sin embargo, las tormentas cerca del Cabo Finisterre, deshicieron la flota, teniendo que ser suspendida las operaciones.

    Sin embargo los 307 soldados españoles de Infantería del Regimiento De la Corona, embarcados en dos fragatas, junto con 2.000 mosquetes para armas a los rebeldes, desembarcaron en Escocia y se unieron a los rebeldes jacobitas, entre los que se contaba el famoso Rob Roy.

    Unas semanas antes de que la gran flota se dispersara, el conde mariscal George Keith, que dirigia las operaciones, había ocupado sin problemas la isla de Lewis, en las Hébridas exteriores (bastión del poderoso clan MacLeod of Lewis), y su capital, Stornoway , donde se instaló un primer campamento, para pasar a continuación a desembarcar en las Highlands, cerca del lago Alsh.

    Los montañeses ante la falta de fe en la empresa y de noticias del desembarco en el sur, no se sumaron a la revuelta en el numero esperado, por lo que tuvo que cambiarse los planes originales de ocupar Inverness, capital de las Highlands, dirigiéndose al castillo de Eilean Donan (bastión de los MacKenzies y MacRaes)

    Tras dejar una guarnición en el castillo de unos 50 hombres, junto con las provisiones las tropas partieron al sur en busca de más apoyos.

    Tras un mes de ocupación, tres fragatas británicas penetraron en el lago Alsh y desde allí bombardearon la fortaleza de Eilean Donan que sufrió muchos daños, hasta la capitulación de los españoles, se comenta que se encontraron entre las ruinas «un mercenario irlandés, un capitán, un teniente español, un sargento, un rebelde escocés y 39 soldados españoles, 343 barriles de pólvora y 52 barriles con munición para mosquetes», los españoles fueron llevados a las fragatas y conducidos por mar hasta Leith cerca de Edimburgo, donde fueron encarcelados.

    Por su parte el resto de las tropas españolas y escocesas jacobitas, finalmente tendrían que enfrentarse a los británicos y escoceses unionistas, en Glenshiel.

    Orden de Batalla en Glen Shiel

    1. Españoles y Jacobitas:

    • El grueso estaba constituido por:
      • Un regimiento español, que contaba aproximadamente 274 soldados, bajo su Coronel, Don Nicolás Bolaño.
      • El Clan Cameron de Lochiel con aproximadamente 150 hombres.
      • Aproximadamente 150 hombres de Lidcoat y otros 20 voluntarios.
      • Rob Roy, jefe de Clan MacGregor con 40 hombres.
      • El Clan MacKinnon con 50 hombres
    • A la izquierda: El Clan MacKenzie con 200 hombres de Lord Seaforth, y mandado por Sir John Mackenzie de Coul. El jefe de Clan MacKenzie, Lord Seaforth, en el lado de Friegan Ouran, contaba con otros 200 de sus mejores hombres.
    • A la derecha, Lord George Murray, el hijo del jefe de Clan Murray, se situó sobre una colina en la orilla sur del río Glen shiel, ocupadandolo con aproximadamente 150 hombres bajo el mando de Tullibardine en el centro, acompañado por Glendaruel
    • El General Mackintosh de Borlum estaba con el Coronel español. El jefe del Clan Keith, el Conde-Mariscal George Keith y el General rebelde Campbell estaban con Seaforth a la izquierda.


    2. El Ejército del Gobierno británico (Comandante en Jefe el General Joseph Wightman):
    • El ala derecha fue mandada por el Coronel Clayton y la componían:
      • 150 granaderos bajo el Major Milburn; del Regimiento de Montagu, mandado por Teniente Coronel Lawrence.
      • un destacamento de 50 hombres bajo Coronel Harrison.
      • el Regimiento holandés de Huffel,
      • Cuatro compañías de Arnerongen del Clan Fraser, Clan Ross y el Clan Sutherland.
    • En el flanco había 80 hombres del Clan MacKay conducidos por su jefe Lord Strathnaver , abanderado de los Mackay.
    • El ala izquierda , que fue desplegada en el lado del sur del río Glen shiel, consistió en:
      • El Regimiento de Clayton, mandado por Teniente-Coronel Reading
      • Con aproximadamente 100 hombres del Clan Munro en el flanco, mandados por George Munro de Culcairn.
    • Los dragones del gobierno y los cuatro morteros permanecieron detrás en el camino.

    Los españoles habían ocupado la cima y el frente de una de las colinas (llamada hoy en día The Peak of the Spaniards, «El pico de los españoles»), mientras sus aliados escoceses se apostaban a los lados e instalaban algunas barricadas.

    El primer ataque ingles comenzó a las cinco de la tarde, siendo rechazado, aunque el general Wightman, pudo comprobar que la parte mas débil del despliegue eran las tropas escocesas mas numerosas pero peor entrenadas.

    En ese momento, Rob Roy resultó gravemente herido y el clan McGregor abandonó la batalla para ponerlo a salvo. Poco después, varios clanes más siguieron sus pasos y dejaron prácticamente solos a sus aliados españoles, que se retiraron hacia lo alto de la colina.

    Tres horas después de comenzar el combate y ante la deserción de sus aliados los españoles se rindieron siendo conducidos a Edimburgo.

    En octubre las negociaciones entre España y Gran Bretaña permitieron su regreso a España.

    De Panzerzug.es, escrito por Vladi




    Última edición por Reke_Ride; 18/08/2009 a las 19:37
    "De ciertas empresas podría decirse que es mejor emprenderlas que rechazarlas, aunque el fin se anuncie sombrío"






  7. #47
    Avatar de Ordóñez
    Ordóñez está desconectado Puerto y Puerta D Yndias
    Fecha de ingreso
    14 mar, 05
    Ubicación
    España
    Edad
    39
    Mensajes
    10,255
    Post Thanks / Like

    Respuesta: Causa Jacobita

    Una versión curiosa del " Ye jacobites by name ":

    YouTube - Ye Jacobites By Name - Stamp'n Go Shanty

  8. #48
    Avatar de Ordóñez
    Ordóñez está desconectado Puerto y Puerta D Yndias
    Fecha de ingreso
    14 mar, 05
    Ubicación
    España
    Edad
    39
    Mensajes
    10,255
    Post Thanks / Like

  9. #49
    Avatar de Ordóñez
    Ordóñez está desconectado Puerto y Puerta D Yndias
    Fecha de ingreso
    14 mar, 05
    Ubicación
    España
    Edad
    39
    Mensajes
    10,255
    Post Thanks / Like

    Respuesta: Causa Jacobita

    JACOBITA





    Por el Trono Legítimo,
    Por la Católica Religión,
    Jacobita es mi nombre,
    Contra la Revolución,


    Cruz de San Jorge,
    Con aspas escocesas,
    Alianza, comunión,
    Con arpas irlandesas,


    Llevo una boina azul,
    Rematada con orgullosa orla,
    Faldas de altas tierras,
    Gente guerrera y honrosa,


    Soy astuto como el zorro,
    Ágil y veloz como el caballo,
    Tengo el sentimiento del clan,
    No conozco el desmayo,


    Si quieren saber mi nombre,
    Que me llamen jacobita,
    Dulce aroma de Britania,
    Es mi tradicional vida,


    Mi sangre por mi patria,
    Mi espada por los Estuardos,
    ¡ Mi nombre es jacobita,
    La lealtad me va guiando !

  10. #50
    Avatar de Ordóñez
    Ordóñez está desconectado Puerto y Puerta D Yndias
    Fecha de ingreso
    14 mar, 05
    Ubicación
    España
    Edad
    39
    Mensajes
    10,255
    Post Thanks / Like

  11. #51
    Avatar de Ordóñez
    Ordóñez está desconectado Puerto y Puerta D Yndias
    Fecha de ingreso
    14 mar, 05
    Ubicación
    España
    Edad
    39
    Mensajes
    10,255
    Post Thanks / Like

    Respuesta: Causa Jacobita

    A los más versados en el tema, ¿ qué os parece ?

    « LA REVOLUCIÓN INGLESA | Inicio | LOS JACOBITAS -2- »

    LOS JACOBITAS -1-

    Posteado por: retratosdelahistoria el 28 may En: Temas Reyes de Gran-Bretaña - sin comentarios


    El "Jacobitismo" fue el movimiento político dedicado a la restauración de los reyes de la dinastía Stuart (o Stewart, o Estuardo en castellano) en los tronos de Inglaterra y de Escocia (ambas coronas reunidas en el denominado Reino-Unido de Gran-Bretaña, en 1707). El movimiento tomó su nombre del latín Jacobus , del nombre del rey Jacobo II de Inglaterra y VII de Escocia, y fue la respuesta a la deposición de este mismo monarca durante la Glorious Revolution (la Revolución Gloriosa) de 1688, y que supuso su sustitución en el trono por su hija mayor María II (de Fe anglicana), conjuntamente con su esposo el Príncipe Guillermo III de Orange, estatuder de Holanda, ambos protestantes. Exiliados, los últimos Stuarts vivieron en el continente Europeo (en Francia y en Italia) y, ocasionalmente, obtuvieron el respaldo moral, político y militar de Francia, Roma y España para recuperar su trono. El origen del movimiento tuvo lugar en las Islas Británicas, sobretodo en Irlanda y en Escocia, especialmente en las Highlands (tierras altas de Escocia), y con algún que otro apoyo de ingleses y galeses, particularmente en Cumbria (Norte de Inglaterra). Los monárquicos o realistas apoyaban entonces el movimiento Jacobita porque creían que el Parlamento no tenía autoridad para interferir en la sucesión real, y muchos católicos británicos fueron partícipes de ese movimiento para restaurar también la predominancia de su Fe en un reino generalmente anglicano o presbiteriano que negaba cualquier sumisión a la autoridad del papa de Roma desde el siglo XVI (con Enrique VIII de Inglaterra); en cuanto al pueblo, se vió envuelto en diversas campañas militares por diferentes motivos. En Escocia, el Jacobitismo tuvo una buena acogida entre los clanes de las Highlands.
    El emblema de los Jacobitas fue la "Rosa Blanca de York", que tiene su fecha de celebración el 10 de junio, aniversario del nacimiento en 1688 de Jacobo Francisco Eduardo Stuart "el Viejo Pretendiente" (1688-1766), Príncipe de Gales y Duque de Albany (hijo del destronado rey Jacobo II), que fue privado de sus derechos al trono británico por el Parlamento de Londres.
    Trasfondo Político
    En la segunda mitad del siglo XVII, las Islas Británicas pasaban por una época de inestabilidad política y religiosa. La protestante Commonwealth republicana de Cromwell terminó con la restauración del rey Carlos II Stuart, quien quiso imponer la Iglesia Anglicana Episcopaliana en Escocia provocando rebeliones (Covenanters y Cameronians), duramente reprimidas cuando hubo un serio conato de contraataque por parte de los Presbiterianos.
    Jacobo II Stuart (1633-1701), Duque de York y luego Rey de Inglaterra, de Escocia e Irlanda de 1685 a 1688.
    Muerto en 1685, Carlos II fue sucedido por su hermano el hasta entonces Duque de York, que para colmo de males era abiertamente católico: Jacobo II de Inglaterra y VII de Escocia, y que era, en cierto modo, una prolongación de ese desdén familiar por la democracia, provocando la férrea oposición del Parlamento a que ciñera la corona (ya en vida de su hermano Carlos II). Su lema describía perfectamente sus ideas: "A Deo Rex, A Rege Lex" (el Rey procede de Dios, la Ley procede del Rey).
    Richard Talbot, 1er Conde de Tyrconnell (1630-1691) y Virrey de Irlanda.
    En Irlanda, el nuevo rey nombró al primer virrey católico desde los tiempos de la Reforma, Richard Talbot, 1er Conde de Tyrconnell, y procuró reducir el ascendente protestante en el seno de la administración y la vida parlamentaria irlandesa, además de hacerse con los puntos claves con destacamentos militares leales a la causa absolutista por toda la geografía insular.
    Retrato de María II Stuart (1662-1694), Princesa de Orange y luego Reina de Inglaterra, de Escocia e Irlanda a partir de 1689, como sucesora de su padre Jacobo II.
    En Inglaterra y en Escocia, Jacobo II intentó imponer la tolerancia religiosa, mediante la colaboración de la minoría católica pero provocando a la mayoría protestante. Su yerno, el Príncipe Guillermo III de Orange, que andaba forjando alianzas contra Francia, atrajo entorno a su persona a los miembros del partido Whigh, que le eran afines y que respaldaban el proyecto de entregar la corona británica a la princesa María (hija mayor de Jacobo II), que representaba la línea Stuart anglicana. La oposición parlamentaria llegó a su punto álgido cuando Jacobo II, viudo de su anterior matrimonio y nuevamente casado con una princesa italiana y católica (Mª Beatriz de Este-Módena), tuvo a su primer hijo varón en junio de 1688, inmediatamente reconocido como Príncipe de Gales. Fue entonces cuando los enemigos del rey ofrecieron sin más dilación, a Guillermo III de Orange y a María, la oportunidad de deponer a Jacobo II. El desembarco del Príncipe de Orange se produjo en noviembre y, ante semejante noticia, alarmado y viéndose abandonado por todos, el rey Jacobo II huyó de Londres para refugiarse en Francia con su pequeña familia, escoltado por el Duque de Lauzun (enviado del rey Luis XIV a Londres). En febrero de 1689, la Gloriosa Revolución cambió formalmente el monarca británico, pero algunos católicos, episcopalianos y tories, marcadamente realistas, convencieron al Parlamento de que no tenía el derecho de definir la sucesión de la Corona Británica, y seguían apoyando abiertamente al rey Jacobo II.
    Escultura policromada representando a Guillermo III de Nassau, Príncipe de Orange y Estatúder de Holanda (1650-1702), proclamado Rey de Inglaterra, de Escocia e Irlanda junto con su esposa la reina María II, tras triunfar la Gloriosa Revolución que derrocó a su suegro...
    Escocia aceptó con cierta lentitud y precaución a Guillermo III de Orange, quien convocó una Convención de los Estados el 14 de marzo de 1689 en Edimburgo, considerando conciliadora la carta tranquilizadora del esposo de María II. Las fuerzas Cameronianas, junto con el Clan Campbell de las Highlands, liderados por el Conde de Argyll, se erigieron en el más firme apoyo en Escocia de Guillermo III. Por otro lado, la caballería escocesa, liderada por John Graham of Claverhouse, Vizconde Dundee, que inicialmente seguía siendo leal a Jacobo II, acabó por pasar al bando de Guillermo III ante la evidencia de quién era el hombre fuerte del momento. La convención llegó finalmente a la determinación de reconocer a Guillermo III de Orange y a María II Stuart, proclamándoles nuevos soberanos en Edimburgo (11 de abril de 1689), celebrándose su doble coronación en Londres en el mes de mayo siguiente.
    Religión, Políticos y Aventureros
    Retrato de Sir Mungo Murray (1668-1700), caballero escocés del Clan Murray enfundado en su típico atuendo, según J.M. Wright.
    En consecuencia, el movimiento Jacobita se vió limitado al entorno de los católicos romanos, mayormente representados en Irlanda, mientras que los católicos británicos permanecían siendo una minoría. Los católicos formaban entonces el 75 % de la población irlandesa, cuando en Inglaterra rondaban el 1 % y en Escocia tan solo el 2 %. Por ello no es de extrañar que el apoyo irlandés a Jacobo II fuera mayoritariamente católico cuando éste se refugió en Francia y el país galo se enfrentaba a la Liga de Augsburgo. La guerra en Irlanda fue predominantemente católica-nacionalista hasta su derrota en 1691, punto de inflexión que trasladó el apoyo Jacobita (las Brigadas Irlandesas) a Francia y se hiciera presente en las filas del Ejército Francés. En Inglaterra, los católicos procedían sobretodo de la "gentry" (pequeña nobleza e hidalguía de provincias), y formaron una especie de comité de apoyo ideológico durante dos centurias, siendo una minoría habitualmente perseguida por el Estado y que se unió con entusiasmo a los ejércitos Jacobitas, además de contribuir económicamente al mantenimiento financiero de la corte de los Stuarts en el exilio (entonces instalada en Saint-Germain-en-Laye, Francia). Algunos escoceses de las Highlands, como los MacDonalds de Clanranald, permanecieron en el seno del catolicismo, pero forman parte de esa escasa lista de excepciones.
    Hay que sumar a esa corriente contraria a la soberanía de Guillermo III y de María II, el firme apoyo de los Anglicanos británicos que se negaron a jurar a los nuevos monarcas, y que procedían en gran parte de ese clero de la Iglesia de Inglaterra que rechazaba, en principio, reconocer a los reyes mientras siguiera vivo Jacobo II, desarrollando además un cisma episcopaliano en la Iglesia mediante pequeñas congregaciones localizadas en las ciudades inglesas.
    John Campbell, 2º Duque de Argyll (1678-1743), retratado por William Aikman.
    Por otro lado habría que citar a los episcopalianos escoceses que proporcionaron más de la mitad de las fuerzas Jacobitas, y que procedían de las tierras bajas (Lowlands). Aunque protestantes, fueron igualmente discriminados en el ámbito político de Escocia y reducidos a ser una minoría apartada de la recién establecida y favorecida Iglesia de Escocia. Otros episcopalianos prefirieron adoptar el papel de la pasividad ante la ola de Jacobitismo y acomodarse del nuevo régimen establecido por la Gloriosa Revolución. Otro sector de los episcopalianos que respaldaban el movimiento Jacobita, y procedente de las Lowlands, fueron igualmente ignorados por su marcada tendencia a llevar el traje típico de las Highlands, considerado como uniforme Jacobita y como una clara muestra de simpatía hacia los Stuarts exiliados. El conflicto entre los clanes de las Highlands fue tanto en el plano político como religioso, y se convirtió en un factor determinante de la resistencia popular ante las ambiciones del poderoso Clan Campbell de Argyll, de confesión presbiteriana.

    Retrato de Lord George Keith, 10º Conde Mariscal de Escocia (1693-1778), y de su hermano el Honorable James Keith (1696-1757) -abajo-, que lucharon en el bando Jacobita y, vencidos, tuvieron que exiliarse, poniéndose al servicio de Prusia donde se labraron brillantes carreras. El primero, aunque mariscal, fue diplomático en diversas cortes europeas incluyendo la de Londres, y el segundo acabó como mariscal prusiano e íntimo del rey Federico II...

    Otra fuente de apoyo al movimiento Jacobita procede sin duda de ese segmento social políticamente desatendido. Algunos relevantes Whighs, entre ellos el Conde de Mar, reaccionó contra las directrices políticas procedentes de Londres uniéndose a los Jacobitas. Otros escoceses patriotas como Lord George Keith, 10º Conde Mariscal (1693-1778) y Lord Sinclair, se unieron y apoyaron a los Jacobitas después de 1707, en la esperanza de liberar Escocia del yugo británico. En cuanto a los Tories, éstos se mostraron como los mejores defensores del movimiento Jacobita en el escenario político londinense, aunque algunos de ellos se mostraran reacios a convertirse en los defensores de un rey católico. Ya en la época de 1715-1722, cuando la dinastía Hanoveriana pareció desmantelar el predominio Anglicano y, en 1743-1745 los Whighs vencieron en el Parlamento a los Tories entonces en el poder, éstos se volvieron hacia los Jacobitas, aunque jamás emprendieron acciones serias. A partir de ese momento, ningún Tory volvió a respaldarles ni a defenderles seriamente, más cuando éstos obtenían alguna que otra intervención extranjera que se inmiscuía en los asuntos británicos.
    En cuanto a otros Jacobitas reclutados, se pueden tachar de personajes aventureros, mayormente compuestos por gente desesperada y movidos por problemas financieros que pretendían solucionar. Así podríamos citar a varios personajes sin empleo que intentaban excitar a esa pequeña nobleza empobrecida, como William Boyd, 4º Conde de Kilmarnock, que serviría al Príncipe Carlos como coronel y se convertiría en general tras la batalla de Falkirk, contribuyendo de manera significativa en las exitosas campañas militares de los Jacobitas. En otros casos, se trataba tan solo de mercenarios que se convertían en espías e informadores por cuenta ajena.
    Ideología y Política Jacobita
    Desde los senderos de la religiosidad, la ideología Jacobita pasó a ser una forma de pensar entre las familias de la nobleza, de la hidalguía y burguesía provinciana que tenían en sus casas retratos de la exiliada familia real, de caballeros y de mártires de la causa Jacobita, hasta llegar a fomentar cenáculos de franco-masones. Aún hoy día, algunos clanes de las Highlands y regimientos suelen proceder a una curiosa ceremonia cuando, en el momento del brindis, pasan sus copas por encima de un vaso de agua y lo dedican "al rey que está más allá de las aguas" (es el brindis de los leales a los Estuardo). Se desarrollaron incluso comunidades en otras áreas, dónde confraternizaban en establecimientos, locales o posadas Jacobitas, cantando canciones sediciosas, recolectando fondos para la causa y, en ocasiones, reclutando a nuevos miembros. El Gobierno intentó cerrar esos centros de reuniones subversivas, pero cuando un local era cerrado otro se abría casi de inmediato en otro lugar. En ellos, los simpatizantes de la causa vendían copas talladas y grabadas, broches y otros objetos decorados con símbolos Jacobitas, además de revestir los tan populares tartanes que fueron tan perseguidos por los primeros reyes de la Casa de Hannover, hasta el punto de hacerlos desaparecer. La actividad "criminal" del contrabando fue, además, asociada al Jacobitismo en toda Gran-Bretaña, porque algunos contrabandos beneficiaban a los Jacobitas exiliados en Francia.
    Retrato oval del Rey Jacobo II de Inglaterra y VII de Escocia (1633-1701).
    La política oficial de la corte en el exilio reflejó inicialmente la intransigencia del rey Jacobo II. Contando con el poderoso apoyo de Francia para defender su causa, éste se negó a reconciliarse con sus súbditos protestantes, hasta que en 1703 fue presionado por el propio Luis XIV para que intentara aplanar las diferencias, en la esperanza de obtener el alejamiento de Gran-Bretaña de la Gran Alianza, prometiendo esencialmente mantener el status quo. La política cambió prontamente de dirección con la promesa Jacobita de restaurar la independencia de Escocia, explotando así el ultraje que supuso para el orgullo escocés verse forzados a suscribir el Acta de Unión de 1707 (que unía Escocia a Inglaterra, y suprimía su parlamento de Edimburgo en favor del de Londres), acrecentando las filas Jacobitas por esos motivos, con gente directamente alienada y desposeída de sus bienes o libertades.
    La Guerra Jacobita en Irlanda
    Jacobo II y VII, y su virrey irlandés Richard Talbot, 1er Conde de Tyrconnell, se aseguraron de que Irlanda fuese un bastión de la causa católica, acción que culminaría con el asedio de Derry el 7 de diciembre de 1688. Sin embargo, cuando Jacobo II fue depuesto y tomó la decisión de refugiarse en las costas francesas, obtuvo el inmediato apoyo de su primo el rey Luis XIV, regresando a Irlanda con las fuerzas renovadas y dispuesto a enfrentarse a su yerno Guillermo III de Orange el 12 de marzo de 1689. Tomó Dublin y acudió al asedio de Londonderry, consiguiendo reavivar el apoyo irlandés a la causa católica-nacionalista que se tradujo en una oposición frontal irlandesa a los intentos del Parlamento de Londres de imponer sus leyes. Pero después de agosto de 1689, el ejército británico reanudó su ofensiva contra Londonderry, echando a las fuerzas Jacobitas del Ulster. En julio del año siguiente, el ejército de Guillermo III (36.000 hombres) triunfó definitivamente en la batalla del Boyne -1 de Julio de 1690-, provocando la desbandada de las fuerzas Jacobitas (25.000 soldados) y el regreso del rey Jacobo II a Francia, rodeado de lo que quedaba de su ejército (posteriormente conocido como "Brigada Irlandesa" e integrado en los ejércitos del rey de Francia).
    Retrato ecuestre del Príncipe Guillermo III de Orange (1650-1702), según Jan Wyck, c.1688.
    Bonnie Dundee
    El 16 de abril de 1689, un mes poco después de que se celebrase la Convención de Edimburgo, y cinco días después de que proclamase como nuevos soberanos a Guillermo III y María II, el Vizconde Dundee, apodado "Bonnie Dundee" por sus partidarios, levantó ostentosamente el estandarte del rey Jacobo II sobre sus tierras y al frente de 50 hombres. Inicialmente tuvo dificultades para reclutar más hombres y conseguir apoyos, pero después contó con una tropa de 200 irlandeses en Kintyre, y el apoyo de los clanes de las Highlands católicos y episcopalianos que se unieron a la causa.
    Retrato en miniatura de John Graham of Claverhouse, Vizconde Dundee (1648-1689), apodado "Bonnie Dundee".
    Sin embargo, la victoria Jacobita de los Highlanders en la batalla de Killiecrankie (27 de julio de 1689), se vió mermada por la muerte de "Bonnie Dundee" (que cayó bajo las balas) y la pérdida de 2.000 hombres. Una serie de expediciones militares del Gobierno supuso la derrota y el fin de los Jacobitas en mayo de 1690, agravada con las noticias que llegaron de la derrota de Jacobo II en el Boyne. Un año más tarde, los Jacobitas se vieron obligados a solicitar a los jefes de los clanes que pidieran permiso a Jacobo II para someterse a Guillermo III, y en enero de 1692, los clanes Jacobitas rindieron formalmente las armas ante el Gobierno de Londres. Obviamente, el rey Guillermo III estaba más interesado en llevar a cabo de forma exitosa su guerra contra Francia, como miembro firmante de la Gran Alianza (Liga de Augsburgo), por lo que no prestó gran atención al asunto escocés, intentando sobornar o coaccionar a los jefes de los clanes para que dejasen las armas y juraran lealtad. La lentitud con que respondió uno de los jefes del Clan MacDonald desembocó en la Masacre de Glencoe, el 13 de febrero de 1692.

  12. #52
    Avatar de Ordóñez
    Ordóñez está desconectado Puerto y Puerta D Yndias
    Fecha de ingreso
    14 mar, 05
    Ubicación
    España
    Edad
    39
    Mensajes
    10,255
    Post Thanks / Like

    Respuesta: Causa Jacobita

    « LOS JACOBITAS -1- | Inicio | LORD CORNBURY o el gobernador travesti »

    LOS JACOBITAS -2-

    Posteado por: retratosdelahistoria el 29 may En: Temas Reyes de Gran-Bretaña - 2 comentarios


    Intento de Invasión del "Viejo Pretendiente"
    En 1701, Jacobo II y VII falleció, siendo sucedido naturalmente por su hijo el Príncipe Jacobo Francisco Eduardo Stuart (James Francis Edward), reconocido como el rey Jacobo III de Inglaterra y VIII de Escocia por las cortes de Francia, España, Módena y Roma. Para sus detractores u opositores era sencillamente el "Viejo Pretendiente".
    Retrato del Príncipe Jacobo Francisco Eduardo Stuart (1688-1766), Príncipe de Gales, Duque de Cornualles y de Rothesay, Conde de Carrick y Lord de Las Islas, Duque de Albany y Conde de Chester... alias Jacobo III de Inglaterra y VIII de Escocia para sus partidarios, y tan solo "el Viejo Pretendiente" para sus enemigos. / Obra de Alexis Simon Belle.
    Tras una breve paz, la Guerra de Sucesión Española hizo que Francia reanudase su apoyo a la causa Jacobita y, en 1708, el príncipe Jacobo, rodeado de tropas francesas, intentó desembarcar en Gran-Bretaña para llevar a cabo una invasión. Sin embargo, la Marina Real Inglesa consiguió hacer retroceder a la flota francesa y el pretendiente tuvo que batir retirada en el Norte de Escocia para retomar el camino a Francia.
    La Unión y los Hannovers
    En marzo de 1702, el rey Guillermo III fallecía a causa de una caída de caballo (reinaba en solitario desde 1694, fecha en que la reina María II había muerto), por lo que la sucesión al trono recaía en su cuñada la Princesa Ana Stuart, Duquesa de Cumberland, pasando a ser la reina Ana I. La economía de Escocia había tocado fondo y estaba en sus horas más bajas, juntándose el hecho de que el Parlamento británico usaba y abusaba de sanciones económicas para forzar al Parlamento escocés a que se aviniera a negociar una unión. Uno de los personajes clave en esas impopulares negociaciones fue John Erskine, 11º Conde de Mar, quien después de dar su apoyo a la rebelión escocesa pasó a ser un firmante del Acta de Unión de 1707, y encargado de llevar a cabo los asuntos escoceses en el nuevo Parlamento británico. En 1713, fue formalmente nombrado secretario de Estado para Escocia por la reina.
    Retrato de Ana I Stuart (1665-1714), Duquesa de Cumberland y Princesa Consorte de Dinamarca, luego Reina de Inglaterra, de Escocia e Irlanda entre 1702 y 1714, al suceder a su cuñado Guillermo III en el trono. Fue la última soberana Estuardo en reinar sobre los británicos pero la primera en ser Reina de Gran-Bretaña e Irlanda...
    Mientras aumentaba el descontento de los Jacobitas, también aumentaban las esperanzas del pretendiente Jacobo Francisco Eduardo Stuart, que pensaba que cada vez estaba más cerca de recuperar la corona de su padre al constatar que todos los numerosos hijos de su hermana Ana I, fallecían en la cuna o antes de llegar a la edad adulta. Sin embargo, para atajar el problema que se veía venir, el Parlamento había confeccionado el Act of Settlement (1701), firmado por Guillermo III y ratificado por el Acta de Unión de 1707, que requería que el monarca británico fuese protestante mientras que el "Viejo Pretendiente" era un devoto católico, único "handicap" que le convertía en un candidato descartable a ojos de los británicos. En consecuencia, la herencia recaía en la descendencia protestante de una hija del rey Jacobo I, representada por el Elector Jorge-Luis de Hannover, bisnieto de ese monarca por lado materno, personaje nada carismático y encima sujeto alemán que desconocía prácticamente la lengua inglesa. Nada popular entre los ingleses, el que iba a convertirse en el rey Jorge I contribuyó personalmente (por su conducta sobretodo) en que renaciera la dormida lealtad hacia los Estuardo. Huelga decir que su llegada a Gran-Bretaña fue acogida con gelidez. Favoreció abiertamente a los Whighs y, en la primavera de 1715, los Tories perdieron las elecciones generales, cediendo el poder al partido Whigh que mucho se encargó de torpedear a los Tories en el momento de intervenir en las negociaciones de paz con Francia.
    Retrato de Jorge I Luis, Elector de Hannover (1665-1727), Rey de Gran-Bretaña e Irlanda de 1714 a 1727, como sucesor de su prima la Reina Ana I Stuart. Su total desapego por los asuntos ingleses y su total desconocimiento del idioma le granjearon muchas antipatías, dando alas al movimiento Jacobita...
    La Rebelión de Lord Mar y otras conspiraciones
    Detalle de un retrato de John Erskine, 11º Conde de Mar (1675-1732)
    Durante los años de hambruna que atenazaron Escocia, hubo un sensible crecimiento de descontentos con la "Unión", haciendo del país tierra abonada para otra rebelión Jacobita. En ese estado de cosas, el Conde de Mar se volvió contra el nuevo Gobierno de Jorge I, formado por esos Whighs dedicados a reprimir aún más a los escoceses, y se puso directamente en contacto con el pretendiente exiliado en Francia, fomentando una conspiración. En agosto de 1715, Mar anunció públicamente que reconocía como único monarca a Jacobo III-VIII, proclamándole rey el 6 septiembre. La Rebelión de Mar atrajo nuevamente a los clanes del Norte de las Lowlands y de las Highlands, reunidos en su odio común a la Unión y al Gobierno Whigh, planeando sublevar el país de Gales y en el condado de Devon. Los rebeldes del Norte de Inglaterra se unieron a los del Sur de Escocia y, con un contingente armado y comandados por el conde de Mar y Thomas Forster (un escudero de Northumberland), marcharon sobre Inglaterra sin encontrar mucha resistencia. Libraron batalla en Preston (9-14 noviembre de 1715), con 4.000 hombres, contra las fuerzas del general inglés Wills, y fueron finalmente derrotados: 1.468 Jacobitas cayeron prisioneros, 463 de éstos siendo ingleses. Los condes de Wintoun, de Nithsdale y de Derwentwater, capturados, fueron sentenciados a la pena capital por traición. Sin embargo, Lord Wintoun y Lord Nithsdale consiguieron fugarse de la Torre de Londres antes de ser decapitados como sus compañeros... Diecisiete Jacobitas murieron, 25 fueron heridos de gravedad y cerca de 200 realistas fueron muertos o heridos.
    Retrato oval del Viejo Pretendiente, Jacobo III Francisco Eduardo Stuart (1688-1766), conocido bajo el título de Duque de Albany...
    El Pretendiente, que había llegado de Francia en barco, se encontraba entonces en el puerto de Peterhead (Aberdeenshire, Escocia) dónde, muerto de aburrimiento por la inacción, se trasladó al palacio de Scone (Perthshire) con su corte, desde el cual tuvo que huír finalmente con Lord Mar al recibir la noticia de la derrota el 4 de febrero de 1716.
    Otra tentativa de invasión fue fomentada por el entonces Cardenal Julio Alberoni, primer ministro del rey Felipe V de España, en 1719. Sin embargo, el esfuerzo español se tradujo en un nuevo fracaso y el contingente allí enviado tuvo que rendirse al término de la batalla de Glen Shiel.
    Hubieron también dos conspiraciones: la "Conspiración Atterbury", llevada a cabo por el obispo de Rochester, Francis Atterbury, que aparte de ser un apasionado Tory, conspiró con Lord Mar para intentar poner en pie una nueva rebelión Jacobita aprovechando las elecciones de 1722, y el escándalo financiero de "la Burbuja de los Mares del Sur" que arruinó a muchísimos inversores y especuladores, como ocurrió en Francia con el escándalo "Law". Sin embargo, las denuncias de espías y los múltiples arrestos abortaron la conspiración.
    La "Conspiración Cornbury", debe su nombre a Lord Cornbury, heredero del Conde de Clarendon, quien quiso aprovechar los desordenes públicos y la crisis acontecida bajo el ministerio de Sir Robert Walpole (1733), y obtuvo el apoyo del embajador francés y del secretario de Estado de Francia al propagar la noticia de la inestabilidad del Gobierno Británico de Jorge II, para llevar a cabo una invasión Jacobita. Sin embargo, el Gobierno francés desestimó el asunto, relevó a su embajador en Londres y Lord Cornbury, abandonado por todos, dejó el escenario político.
    Retrato del Rey Luis XV de Francia y de Navarra (1710-1774), según L.M. Van Loo.
    Más contundente fue la tentativa de invasión auspiciada por Francia en 1744: generada por John Gordon of Glenbucket en 1737, que sugirió a los clanes de las Highlands apoyar una posible y más que esperada invasión francesa de las Islas Británicas, dirigida por un agente Jacobita que trabajaba por cuenta del rey Luis XV, Lord Semphill. Durante 1743, la Guerra de Sucesión Austríaca interrumpió las relaciones diplomáticas franco-británicas, aunque no era oficial, las hostilidades entre los dos países fueron retomadas. A través de Lord Semphill, los ingleses Jacobitas hicieron llegar a Luis XV de Francia una petición formal de que enviara un contingente armado a las costas británicas. Después de que un enviado especial del monarca galo "tomase el pulso" de la opinión británica e hiciera un reconocimiento del terreno, a modo de avanzadilla, Luis XV autorizó la invasión armada del sur de Inglaterra en febrero de 1744. El hijo del "Viejo Pretendiente", el príncipe Carlos Eduardo Stuart (apodado Bonnie Prince Charlie o el Joven Pretendiente), se encontraba entonces exiliado en Roma junto con su padre, que se hacía llamar "Duque de Albany", y fue formalmente invitado a unirse al contingente francés invasor que partía desde las costas del Norte de Francia. Desgraciadamente, una terrible tormenta destruyó el contingente naval y puso término a los planes del monarca francés de invadir Inglaterra. Pese a todo, Francia declaró oficialmente la guerra a Gran-Bretaña, aunque desestimó retomar los planes de invasión...
    Retrato del Príncipe Carlos Eduardo Stuart (1720-1788), Conde de Albany, y más conocido como "el Joven Pretendiente" o "Bonnie Prince Charlie". Para los Jacobitas sería Carlos III de Inglaterra...
    Retrato de Lord George Murray (1700-1760), General Jacobita al servicio de la causa de los Estuardos exiliados y principal dirigente de las tropas Jacobitas en la última campaña...
    Muy a pesar de las contrariedades sufridas por el Joven Pretendiente, también conocido como "Conde de Albany" o Bonnie Prince Charlie, como el fracaso de la invasión francesa a causa de una climatología adversa, recibió un mensaje de un pequeño número de Highlanders que le invitaban a desembarcar en Escocia para "reconquistar", en nombre de su padre, la corona británica. El príncipe Carlos empeñó entonces las joyas de su madre para reunir fondos e hizo los preparativos con la colaboración (y donaciones) de un consorcio de particulares. Desembarcó en la Isla de Eriskay, no lejos de las costas escocesas en julio de 1745, rodeado de 700 voluntarios de las Brigadas Irlandesas repartidos en dos barcos, y con armamento. Su llegada fue acogida con inicial tibieza por parte de los clanes escoceses, hasta que se hizo con Perth y Edimburgo, sin encontrar resistencia. El pequeño destacamento militar inglés de Sir John Cope, en Escocia, se vió sorprendido y atacado en Prestonpans, dando esperanzas y más entusiasmo a los escoceses tras esas victorias tan fáciles. Instalado con su corte en Holyrood Palace, en Edimburgo, el príncipe Carlos planeó avanzar hacia Londres junto con Lord George Murray y sus hombres. Murray llevó a cabo y de manera exitosa las maniobras pertinentes para llegar hasta Derby el 4 de diciembre, ciudad que se encontraba tan solo a 200 km de Londres. Semejante noticia hizo que cundiera el pánico en la capital británica.
    El 16 de abril de 1746, se libró la última batalla entre los rebeldes escoceses del General Lord George Murray y el Ejército Británico a las órdenes del Duque de Cumberland, en Culloden Moor. La victoria Británica supuso el fin del sueño de los Jacobitas y del Joven Pretendiente de recuperar el trono de sus padres usurpado por Jorge II de Hannover...
    Animado por ese nuevo triunfo, el príncipe Carlos confiaba en que llegarían refuerzos navales franceses (desde Dunkerque) para asegurar el éxito de la empresa, pero chocó con la prudencia y los temores de su consejo de guerra, que preferían retirarse a Escocia y mantener desde allí una resistencia armada ante una previsible contra-ofensiva del rey Jorge II, sin duda más poderosa que el ejército de voluntarios escoceses e irlandeses. Desoyendo los consejos, seguro de si mismo y de su triunfo, el príncipe Carlos exigió seguir adelante y marchar sobre Londres. El ejército británico, mandado por el Duque de Cumberland, uno de los hijos de Jorge II, frenó al Joven Pretendiente y lo derrotó en la batalla de Culloden, el 16 de abril de 1746. Carlos tuvo que huír hacia las Highlands, esconderse y disfrazarse de "criada" de Flora MacDonald para conseguir escapar a bordo de un navío francés que lo devolvió sano y salvo a Francia.
    El Príncipe Guillermo-Augusto de Hannover, Duque de Cumberland (1721-1765); hijo menor del rey Jorge II de Gran-Bretaña, enteramente dedicado a la vida militar y al servicio de la tambaleante corona de su progenitor, su victoria sobre los Jacobitas en Culloden le valió el apodo de "el Carnicero de Culloden"...
    En cuanto al Duque de Cumberland, apodado "el Carnicero", éste se encargó de aplastar la rebelión y perseguir a los que habían escapado de Culloden, eliminando de manera efectiva el Jacobitismo que, hasta entonces, había sido el más serio problema político en Gran-Bretaña.
    El fin del movimiento Jacobita
    A partir del fracaso de la rebelión Jacobita de 1745, el movimiento Jacobita entró en una fase inactiva que significó, en cierto modo, su muerte. Si bien los Franceses consiguieron rescatar al príncipe Carlos de las garras de sus enemigos a orillas de Escocia, y darle un recibimiento triunfal en Francia como si de un héroe se tratase, el sueño se esfumó prontamente... Después de las victorias francesas en los Países-Bajos, dejando a Holanda fuera de combate en el conflicto, Inglaterra ofreció a Francia una paz en términos razonables, pero exigió la expulsión inmediata del Joven Pretendiente del país Galo como principal condición para que se llevasen a cabo las negociaciones de paz. El príncipe Estuardo ignoró ostentosamente la orden de expulsión (la corte le invitó a regresar a Roma sin más dilación) y siguió pidiendo más apoyo militar para sus proyectos y su extravagante tren de vida, y participando de lleno en todos los acontecimientos sociales de París. Las quejas del embajador inglés, sumadas a la exasperación del Gobierno Francés, acabaron por provocar su arresto a la salida del teatro de la Opera, su confinamiento y, finalmente, su expulsión fuera del país bajo una fuerte escolta militar (diciembre de 1748). Semejante acto fue muy mal acogido por los parisinos, y duramente recriminado a Luis XV.
    Consecuencias
    Tras la derrota de Culloden Moor (1746), la causa Jacobita dejó de interesar a las potencias europeas enemistadas con Gran-Bretaña. Expulsado de Francia en 1748, el Joven Pretendiente quiso atraer la atención del rey Federico II de Prusia, y obtener su apoyo para llevar a cabo su particular "cruzada". Pero el monarca prusiano le reservó una gélida acogida y mostró su total indiferencia por la suerte de los Estuardo exiliados. Ni siquiera el complot capitaneado por Andrew Murray Elibank obtuvo eco alguno, aunque el príncipe hizo el sacrificio de convertirse al anglicanismo con tal de contentar a sus partidarios ingleses. Las delaciones, las trahiciones y los proyectos abortados acabaron por minar las esperanzas del Joven Pretendiente, cuya conducta se volvió más violenta y brusca a medida que los fracasos se acumulaban. Cansados, los Jacobitas ingleses dejaron de enviarle fondos en 1760, y Carlos volvió a abrazar el catolicismo para regresar a Roma donde el Papa sufragaba sus gastos y su lujoso tren de vida...
    En 1766, el Viejo Pretendiente, Jacobo Francisco Eduardo falleció. En 1788, fue el Joven Pretendiente quien desapareció: se había convertido en un alcohólico, a menudo violento, pero sobretodo en un personaje amargado y abandonado por su sufrida esposa, la princesa Louise von Stolberg-Gedern. Antes de morir, reconoció a una hija nacida de su relación con una joven inglesa católica, la princesa Charlotte Stuart, reconocida como "Duquesa de Albany" (y cuya descendencia sigue reivindicando sus derechos al trono británico).
    El hermano del Joven Pretendiente, Enrique Stuart, Duque de York, había abrazado la carrera clerical al tener vocación religiosa; el papa en persona le ordenó sacerdote y lo convirtió en cardenal, lo que influyó mucho en el distanciamiento de los hermanos. Conocido como el "Cardenal de York", asumió la jefatura de su casa y las pretensiones al trono británico, siendo llamado Enrique IX (1788). Cuando estalló la Revolución Francesa, el Cardenal pasaba por apuros económicos y el propio rey Jorge III de Gran-Bretaña le asignó una pensión para que pudiera seguir viviendo dignamente. Fallecería en 1807, obviamente sin descendencia...
    La sucesión Estuardiana, al menos en lo que se refiere a las pretensiones esgrimibles, recayó inicialmente en la Casa de Saboya y, de ésta, a la Casa Real de Baviera por filiación femenina.
    En Gran-Bretaña, el Gobierno, con tal de prevenir futuros problemas en Escocia, asestó un golpe mortal contra el sistema de los clanes guerreros de las Highlands. Mediante la Ley de Proscritos, que incluía una ley de desarme y sobre el atuendo, se confiscaron todo tipo de armas (blancas y de fuego) y se prohibió llevar el típico atuendo escocés, tanto tartanes como kilts, e incluso se intentó prohibir el uso de la lengua gaélica. Cualquier infracción a esas prohibiciones suponían la cárcel y la acusación de "alta trahición" (por sedición o simpatía Jacobita). Obviamente, la ley se volvía más flexible con los clanes que habían mostrado, desde el principio, lealtad a la dinastía de Hannover y habían combatido a los Jacobitas (como los Campbell de Argyll).
    Jorge IV, Rey de Gran-Bretaña e Irlanda, Rey de Hannover (1762-1830), retratado con el kilt escocés por el pintor Wilkes en 1829...
    Habría que esperar el reinado de Jorge IV de Gran-Bretaña, para que el Jacobitismo, convertido en reliquia del pasado, recuperase ese prestigio a través de autores románticos, gracias a las obras de Robert Burns y de Walter Scott. La contribución de Jorge IV a ese renacer se produjo notablemente en 1822, en el curso de su primera visita a Escocia y cuando visitó Edimburgo enfundado en un kilt típicamente escocés. Resucitó así la costumbre de los tartanes y de los kilts que, volviendo a ser tremendamente populares, regresaron al rango de atuendo nacional de Escocia.

  13. #53
    Avatar de Ordóñez
    Ordóñez está desconectado Puerto y Puerta D Yndias
    Fecha de ingreso
    14 mar, 05
    Ubicación
    España
    Edad
    39
    Mensajes
    10,255
    Post Thanks / Like

    Respuesta: Causa Jacobita

    Un par de imágenes más:





  14. #54
    Avatar de Ordóñez
    Ordóñez está desconectado Puerto y Puerta D Yndias
    Fecha de ingreso
    14 mar, 05
    Ubicación
    España
    Edad
    39
    Mensajes
    10,255
    Post Thanks / Like

  15. #55
    Avatar de Ordóñez
    Ordóñez está desconectado Puerto y Puerta D Yndias
    Fecha de ingreso
    14 mar, 05
    Ubicación
    España
    Edad
    39
    Mensajes
    10,255
    Post Thanks / Like

    Respuesta: Causa Jacobita

    CABALLERO JACOBITA



    Caballero jacobita,
    ¿aún andas susurrando,
    "Bonnie prince Charlie",
    y al tiempo suspirando?


    Portas una banda,
    de cuadros escoceses,
    cubriéndote el pecho,
    de duros reveses,


    Caballero jacobita,
    prócer de Cristiandad,
    ¿cuándo tu espada de honor,
    volverás de nuevo a alzar?


    Caballero jacobita,
    Derby a una jornada,
    recuerdos de Culloden,
    qué triste desgracia,


    Pero aún hay esperanza,
    caballero jacobita,
    nunca desfallezcas de
    la lucha tradicionalista,


    Tu tierra toda volverá,
    al seno católico,
    caballero jacobita,
    tu destino es apostólico,


    Caballero jacobita,
    tuyo será el futuro,
    querido correligionario,
    yo te lo auguro.

  16. #56
    Avatar de Ordóñez
    Ordóñez está desconectado Puerto y Puerta D Yndias
    Fecha de ingreso
    14 mar, 05
    Ubicación
    España
    Edad
    39
    Mensajes
    10,255
    Post Thanks / Like

    Respuesta: Causa Jacobita

    - Informado por mi Cnel_Kurtz


    The Memory of the Jacobite Martyrs of 1715-1716
    On February 24, 1716, on Tower Hill, James Radclyffe, 3rd Earl of Derwentwater,
    a grandson of KING CHARLES II, through his mother, and a prominent Catholic
    nobleman of Northumberland, and William Gordon, 6th Viscount of Kenmure, a
    devout Episcopalian, from the Scottish Borders, were executed for their part in
    the Jacobite Rising of 1715. Robert Dalzell, 5th Earl of Carnwath,
    brother-in-law of Kenmure, William, 4th Lord Widdrington and William Nairne, 2nd
    Lord and later 1st Jacobite Earl of Nairne, were "attainted" but reprieved.
    William Maxwell, 5th Earl of Nithsdale and George Seton, 5th Earl of Wintoun
    both escaped, but spent the rest of the lives in exile in continental Europe.

    Thirty four Jacobites, arrested after the Battle of Preston, on the same day as
    the Battle of Sheriffmuir, November 13, 1715, having been tried at Liverpool in
    January and February of 1716, were hung, drawn and quartered in different towns
    of Lancashire.









    Recuerdo de los Jacobitas Mártires de 1715-1716
    El 24 de febrero de 1716, en Tower Hill, James Radclyffe, 3º Conde de Derwentwater, nieto del REY CARLOS II, por vía materna, y un prominente noble católico de Northumberland, y William Gordon, 6º Vizconde de Kenmure, un devoto episcopaliano, de las Scottish Borders, fueron ejecutados por su participación en el Levantamiento Jacobita de 1715. Robert Dalzell, 5º Conde de Carnwath, cuñado de Kenmure, William, 4º Señor Widdrington y William Nairne, 2º Señor y luego 1º Conde Jacobita de Nairne, fueron privados de sus privilegios y bienes pero salvaron sus vidas. William Maxwell, 5º Conde de Nithsdale y George Seton, 5º Conde de Wintoun escaparon, pero pasaron el resto de sus vidas en el exilio en Europa continental.
    Treinta y cuatro jacobitas, arrestados tras la Batalla de Preston, el mismo día que la Batalla de Sheriffmuir, el 13 de noviembre de 1715, habiendo sido juzgados en Liverpool en enero y febrero de 1716, fueron colgados, ahogados y descuartizados en diferentes aldeas del Lancashire.

  17. #57
    Avatar de Ordóñez
    Ordóñez está desconectado Puerto y Puerta D Yndias
    Fecha de ingreso
    14 mar, 05
    Ubicación
    España
    Edad
    39
    Mensajes
    10,255
    Post Thanks / Like

    Respuesta: Causa Jacobita

    Vaya, se me olvidó poner el enlace: Jacobite · Jacobitism Yesterday and Today

  18. #58
    Avatar de Ordóñez
    Ordóñez está desconectado Puerto y Puerta D Yndias
    Fecha de ingreso
    14 mar, 05
    Ubicación
    España
    Edad
    39
    Mensajes
    10,255
    Post Thanks / Like

  19. #59
    Avatar de Ordóñez
    Ordóñez está desconectado Puerto y Puerta D Yndias
    Fecha de ingreso
    14 mar, 05
    Ubicación
    España
    Edad
    39
    Mensajes
    10,255
    Post Thanks / Like

    Respuesta: Causa Jacobita

    ¿Y esto?


    LEGITIMISMOS DINÁSTICOS Y MONÁRQUICOS DE LA "IZQUIERDA" TRADICIONALISTA: SOCIETY OF THE RED CARNATION


    "Society of the Red Carnation" o Sociedad del Clavel Rojo fue una de las sociedades políticas jacobitas de Gran Bretaña que defendió los principios monárquicos legitimistas combinandolo al mismo tiempo con las reivindicaciones de un socialismo cristiano, a finales del siglo XIX. Sus principales dirigentes fueron E.L.L. Foakes y Gavin Scott." Recordando las insignias de la guerra de las dos rosas que habían enfrentado a los Plantagenet durante la Edad Media, y cuando posteriormente Jacobo Estuardo, Duque de Yorck, se atribuye como emblema dinástico la Rosa Blanca ante todo el legitimismo que lo apoya; aparece finalmente una facción jacobita con una interpretación cristiana y socialista de un legitimismo jacobita, cuyo símbolo sería el Clavel Rojo.


    Anteriormente dediqué un post a la trayectoria de los movimientos monárquicos legitimistas hablando principalmente de los partidarios del Lirio Rojo o "Lys Rouge" en Francia. Fue un resurgir significativo en el seno del movimiento realista francés de una corriente decididamente monárquica legitimista, cristiana católica y socialista, desde una perspectiva podríamos decir e indicar como de "izquierda" tradicionalista, de un socialismo cristiano particularmente blanco que compartía muchas cosas con el propio y llamado movimiento obrero de socialistas, comunistas y anarquistas.

    Esta trayectoria del monarquismo legitimista europeo fue compartido por la propia evolución del Partido Carlista durante los años 70 del siglo XX.

    Algunos opinan que esa explosión evolutiva y contestataria de una interpretación socialista de los movimientos llamados contrarrevolucionarios por la historiografía oficial, resultan simplemente pretencioso, ya que estos mismos historiadores de derechas, ofrecen en bandeja la exclusiva del socialismo a los herederos del movimiento obrero, movimiento nacido y engendrado como respuesta al capitalismo, y por tanto todo el socialismo obrero marxista es POSTCAPITALISTA. Toda respuesta, y reacción contestataria frente al capitalismo resulta ser postcapitalista. Éstos historiadores oficialistas, ya anivel mundial y nacional pretenden ignorar los que ERIC HOBSBAWM destaca como REBELDES PRIMITIVOS. La rebelión campesina que trata de enfrentarse al feudalismo y a sus malos usos por un lado, alidados por otro con las instituciones tradicionales como lo era la Corona y Monarquía defendida por JACOBITAS INGLESES, ESCOCESES E IRLANDESES, VANDEANOS LEGITIMISTAS O REALISTAS FRANCESES Y CARLISTAS DE LAS ESPAÑAS. Ante la inminente llegada del Capitalismo que imponía la burguesía capitalista mediante los golpes de estado que significaron un proceso de revolución liberal burguesa, o revolución de la derecha ideológica conservadora contra el tradicionalismo político que significaban usos y formas comunales de las sociedades primitivas y campesinas, éstas se sublevaron contra la usurpación, contra la instauración de un nuevo régimen liberal burgués, y por ello son considerados movimientos monárquicos legitimistas dinásticos de signo tradicionalista que esgrime un socialismo campesino y cristiano PRECAPITALISTA. Por ello se trata de SOCIALISMOS distintos, tanto en Origen, como en Evolución, porque uno nace de la respuesta alargada en el tiempo al capitalismo, porque la masa obrera prueba los efectos que supone la vía capitalista salvaje. El proletariado se organiza y hace la revolución a la derecha burguesa. Sin embargo el socialismo campesino y cristiano precapitalista es anterior al capitalismo y se subleva contra la entromisión de la burguesía y la oligarquía capitalista en el poder político, pues hasta ese mismo instante solo detentaba el poder económico.




    En los movimientos Contrarrevolucionarios, o Contra derecha liberal burguesa, surge una forma de socialismo legitimista y cristiano. Es decir, que en el seno del tradicionalismo monárquico legitimista surgió un socialismo precapitalista, liderado por hidalgos de la baja nobleza, por clero rural, formado en su gran mayoría por pequeños campesinos, propietarios agricolas, incluso por labriegos y ganaderos defensores del comunal de los municipios, del sistema de clanes, y de las libertades concretas características y vinculadas a ese mundo campesino tradicional. Se trata de una especie de socialismo campesino al que Eric Hobsbawm se refiere como "rebeldes primitivos" y que no es de extrañar pero esa misma terminología hace referencia a la palabra Tory: campesino rebelde católico irlandés, aun antes que dicho término se utilizase para denominar a los conservadores británicos, pues no tendría nada que ver el nombre original con sus postulados liberales conservadores. Aquí queda explicada la diferencia entre dos tipos de socialismo, uno tradicional campesino y precapitalista referenciado a los "rebeldes primitivos" de Hobsbawm, y que serán la masa principal protagonista de los movimientos realistas legitimistas, ya sean Jacobitas ingleses, escoceses o irlandeses, Vandeanos franceses y su chouanerie o los Carlistas de las Españas. La contestación, la reacción al pretencioso liberalismo burgués capitalista fue el grito de los habitantes de una sociedad de sociedades, de unos estados de estados, de redes sociales arcaicas pero para nada antidemocrática, que decidieron enfrentarse a la revolución conservadora burguesa de derechas que pretendía introducir el capitalismo y la mercantilización de la vida como normas supremas constitucionales y "democráticas".




    Así aparece en la escena social y política "The Society of the Red Carnation". La "Sociedad del clavel rojo" fue una de tantas Sociedades jacobitas que se crearon para defender la Causa Legítima de los herederos legítimos de la Dinastía de los Estuardo al Trono de Inglaterra, Escocia e Irlanda. Floreció a finales del siglo XIX. Y se distingue principalmente de otras sociedades jacobitas, porque combinaba el socialismo cristiano con la defensa de la Restauración de la Familia Real en el exilio, heredera legítima de la Dinastía de los Esuardo. Sus líderes en realidad, no son bien conocidos, y muchos historiadores los han ignorado completamente incluso aquellos que estudian los movimientos contrarrevolucionarios para tratar de enquistarlos como fenómenos de extrema derecha, cuando no es así. Los líderes de la Sociedad del Clavel Rojo fueron E.L.L. Foakes y Gavin Scott.




    Podemos decir que el movimiento jacobita inglés, irlandés y escocés es el primer movimiento realista legitimista. Su temprana aparición le llevó a una larga vida dilatada a lo largo del tiempo, y no es de extrañar que existieran interpretaciones socialistas de este movimiento, ya que se el legitimismo del partido jacobita se desarrolló en el siglo XVIII, tiene como resultado al final del siglo XIX una evolución socialista cristiana y legitimista en lo dinástico. Igual que el Carlismo español o el legitimismo realista francés se desarrolla en el siglo XIX y tiene como resultado al final del siglo XX, una evolución socialista cristiana y legitimista en lo dinástico. Así que el caso socialista del Partido Carlista ni es único, ni es una invención sacada de la manga, ni es contrario a la doctrina tradicionalista, porque es más, surge de la misma, ya que es un socialismo que no tiene nada que ver con el socialismo postcapitalista, ya que se trata de un socialismo blanco precapitalista.




    La Sociedad del Clavel Rojo defendió incluso en sus políticas, la nacionalización de los ferrocarriles y las minas, junto con las pensiones de vejez, medidas socialistas de la época que a los liberales del siglo XIX les irritaba profundamente. Finalmente se fusionaron con la Liga legitimista jacobita, una especie de formación política legitimista que trata de integrar a todo el legitimismo monárquico inglés, escocés e irlandés, del mismo modo que Alianza Realista intenta llevar a cabo con todo el monarquismo legitimista donde Nueva Acción Realista está integrada como corriente monárquica legitimista, aunque de orientación socialista.
    Cuestiones que hacen del movimiento realista o legitimista un haz de reivindicación socialista, son por ejemplo: la negación a la deuda nacional y a la creación e instalación de la banca, el hecho que la propiedad de la tierra no pueda comprarse ni venderse porque ésta es un bien intergeneracional o transgeneracional, medidas nacionalizadoras que tratan de sujetar a la plutocracia burguesa en interés de la rex-publica y el bien público, son medidas que ponen en evidencia el comun denominador socialista de estos movimientos precapitalistas comunitarios, que han sido muy maltratados por la historiografía oficial, la cual siempre ha estado al servicio de la oligarquía y la plutocracia burguesa, es decir, la clase dominante que monopolizó el poder cuando consiguió dar el golpe de estado contra las Coronas Legitimistas de Carlos I y Jacobo II de Inglaterra; Luís XVI y Carlos X de Francia; Carlos V y Carlos VII de España.

    Publicado por M. Fernández en 17:06 0 comentarios
    Etiquetas: Carlismo, Francia, Inglaterra, Jacobitismo, Legitimismo, Monarquía, Política, Socialismo Blanco

  20. #60
    Chanza está desconectado Miembro graduado
    Fecha de ingreso
    03 abr, 06
    Mensajes
    1,183
    Post Thanks / Like

    Respuesta: Causa Jacobita

    Libros antiguos y de colección en IberLibro
    ¡Por favor! Esto es la clase de basura que no se puede contribuir a difundir.

    El tal Manuel Fernández de Sevilla es un joven bastante ignorante y extravagante neo hugonote, de militancia exclusivamente virtual. Su campo favorito de expansión electrónica es Facebook. En dicha red social se coló en un grupo jacobita, hizo en pésimo inglés un par de intentos que recibieron réplica de los miembros, y usando lo poco que entendió de esas réplicas elaboró en su disparatado cuaderno de bitácora la disparatada entrada que Ordóñez reproduce. Entretanto, los jacobitas lo expulsaron de su grupo en Facebook.

    El "corta y pega" es peligroso. Puede ayudar al enemigo, y desde luego no ayuda a formar el criterio de los recién llegados, que en Internet son mayoría.

Página 3 de 5 PrimerPrimer 12345 ÚltimoÚltimo

Información de tema

Usuarios viendo este tema

Actualmente hay 1 usuarios viendo este tema. (0 miembros y 1 visitantes)

Temas similares

  1. O'Duffy un miembro del IRA en la Causa Nacional
    Por Litus en el foro Historia y Antropología
    Respuestas: 13
    Último mensaje: 02/03/2009, 00:15
  2. La causa de que la Iglesia no evangelice: el ecumenismo
    Por Hyeronimus en el foro Crisis de la Iglesia
    Respuestas: 3
    Último mensaje: 10/04/2008, 04:48
  3. Respuestas: 0
    Último mensaje: 29/12/2005, 13:06
  4. Respuestas: 0
    Último mensaje: 28/10/2005, 23:52
  5. Respuestas: 1
    Último mensaje: 09/10/2005, 06:42

Permisos de publicación

  • No puedes crear nuevos temas
  • No puedes responder temas
  • No puedes subir archivos adjuntos
  • No puedes editar tus mensajes
  •